The assessment of dark skin and dermatological disorders

Joseph Manning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The UK has a multicultural population with a range of skin colours and hair types. Dermatological disorders affect up to 33 per cent of the population, and cause severe problems for about 10 per cent of cases (All Parliamentary Group on Skin, 1997). The detrimental effects of dermatological disorders include social isolation and stigma (Lewis-Jones, 2000). In order to minimise these negative effects it is important that patients are assessed and diagnosed efficiently and with compassion so that they can be treated appropriately.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-51
Number of pages4
JournalNursing times
Volume100
Issue number22
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Stigma
Skin Pigmentation
Social Isolation
Skin
Hair
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The assessment of dark skin and dermatological disorders. / Manning, Joseph.

In: Nursing times, Vol. 100, No. 22, 01.06.2004, p. 48-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manning, J 2004, 'The assessment of dark skin and dermatological disorders' Nursing times, vol. 100, no. 22, pp. 48-51.
Manning, Joseph. / The assessment of dark skin and dermatological disorders. In: Nursing times. 2004 ; Vol. 100, No. 22. pp. 48-51.
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