The adaptation of Chinese split-site business students to British classrooms: a cross-cultural perspective.

Liyuan Wang, Hilary Nesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chinese business education differs from British business education in many respects. On the whole, it focuses on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge, whereas British business education places far more emphasis on soft management skills and team-work. This paper examines a two-site business degree program offered by a Chinese international school and a British business school, and explores the attitudes and expectations of the Chinese participants and their Chinese and British lecturers from an “English for specific purposes” perspective. The study identifies areas of difficulty for Chinese business students in the UK, in particular regarding their beliefs about teacher and student roles, their learning priorities and learning strategies, and their “goal-oriented” approach to discussion, which is at odds with the more collaborative and exploratory Western discussion strategies. The findings have implications for pre-sessional and in-sessional English course design, the management of split-site business degree programs, the teaching of Chinese students, and the enhancement of learning experiences generally in international business programs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401–425
Number of pages25
JournalFrontiers of Education in China
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2018

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business education
classroom
student
business school
learning strategy
management
learning
university teacher
Teaching
teacher
school
experience

Bibliographical note

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • Chinese students
  • tertiary business education
  • cultures of learning
  • English for specific purposes

Cite this

The adaptation of Chinese split-site business students to British classrooms: a cross-cultural perspective. / Wang, Liyuan; Nesi, Hilary.

In: Frontiers of Education in China, Vol. 13, No. 3, 16.10.2018, p. 401–425 .

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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