Teaching Assistants, Computers and Classroom Management

Helen Johnson, Sandra McNally, Heather Rolfe, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, Robert Savage, Janet Vousden, Clare Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Many students still leave school without a good grasp of basic literacy, despite the negative implications for future educational and labour market outcomes. We evaluate how resources may be used within classrooms to reinforce the teaching of literacy. Specifically, teaching assistants are trained to deliver a tightly structured package of materials to groups of young children aged 5-6. The training is randomly allocated between and within schools. Within schools, teaching assistants are randomly assigned to receive training in either computer-aided instruction or the paper equivalent. Both interventions have a short-term impact on children’s reading scores, although the effect is bigger for the paper intervention and more enduring in the subsequent year. This paper shows how teaching assistants can be used to better effect within schools, and at a low cost.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-36
Number of pages16
JournalLabour Economics
Volume58
Early online date23 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

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Literacy
Education
Labor market outcomes
Costs
Resources

Bibliographical note

Open Access Article, Under a Creative Commons license

Keywords

  • ICT
  • Literacy
  • Teaching assistants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Johnson, H., McNally, S., Rolfe, H., Ruiz-Valenzuela, J., Savage, R., Vousden, J., & Wood, C. (2019). Teaching Assistants, Computers and Classroom Management. Labour Economics, 58, 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.labeco.2019.02.006

Teaching Assistants, Computers and Classroom Management. / Johnson, Helen; McNally, Sandra; Rolfe, Heather; Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer; Savage, Robert; Vousden, Janet; Wood, Clare.

In: Labour Economics, Vol. 58, 06.2019, p. 21-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, H, McNally, S, Rolfe, H, Ruiz-Valenzuela, J, Savage, R, Vousden, J & Wood, C 2019, 'Teaching Assistants, Computers and Classroom Management' Labour Economics, vol. 58, pp. 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.labeco.2019.02.006
Johnson H, McNally S, Rolfe H, Ruiz-Valenzuela J, Savage R, Vousden J et al. Teaching Assistants, Computers and Classroom Management. Labour Economics. 2019 Jun;58:21-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.labeco.2019.02.006
Johnson, Helen ; McNally, Sandra ; Rolfe, Heather ; Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer ; Savage, Robert ; Vousden, Janet ; Wood, Clare. / Teaching Assistants, Computers and Classroom Management. In: Labour Economics. 2019 ; Vol. 58. pp. 21-36.
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