Surface engineering for the control of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) wettability characteristics using laser beam wavelength

Jonathan Lawrence, David Waugh, Chris Walton, Niels Langer, Samantha Bidualt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The science and technology behind using laser beam wavelength and the subsequent manipulation of a material’s polar component (through atmospheric oxygen content) to design and control the contact angle behaviour of the surface of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is presented. The findings indicate that the theory will be applicable to most polymers. When exposed to infrared (IR) CO2 laser irradiation the PET surface experienced no change in chemistry and, therefore, no change in polar component occurred. There was, however, topography change to produce a rougher surface; consequently, advancing contact angle followed the Wenzel, etc. theories and increased, changing the surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. In contrast, ultraviolet (UV) KrF excimer laser beam radiation altered both the topography and chemistry of the PET surface. The very nature of processing polymers with UV laser radiation inherently generates a surface that is more oxygen-rich with enhanced functional groups, which cause an increase in its polar nature. This UV laser irradiation–induced enhanced polar nature has more of an effect than topography for polymers, which, in turn, effects a decrease in advancing contact angle. In this instance the PET surface became more hydrophilic. There is now movement towards a new science-based platform from which to assess, research and establish the methodologies for wettability characteristics design and modification through controlled laser beam exposure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-press)
JournalInternational Journal of Wettability Science and Technology
Volume1
Issue number2
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

wettability
laser
wavelength
engineering
polymer
topography
science and technology
functional group
irradiation
oxygen
methodology

Keywords

  • CO2 laser
  • KrF excim r laser
  • Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
  • Surface engineering
  • Wettability
  • Contact angle
  • Functional groups
  • Polar component

Cite this

Surface engineering for the control of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) wettability characteristics using laser beam wavelength. / Lawrence, Jonathan; Waugh, David; Walton, Chris ; Langer, Niels; Bidualt, Samantha.

In: International Journal of Wettability Science and Technology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 05.12.2018, p. (In-press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1c558012804a4271a7ccdb8aba82a711,
title = "Surface engineering for the control of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) wettability characteristics using laser beam wavelength",
abstract = "The science and technology behind using laser beam wavelength and the subsequent manipulation of a material’s polar component (through atmospheric oxygen content) to design and control the contact angle behaviour of the surface of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is presented. The findings indicate that the theory will be applicable to most polymers. When exposed to infrared (IR) CO2 laser irradiation the PET surface experienced no change in chemistry and, therefore, no change in polar component occurred. There was, however, topography change to produce a rougher surface; consequently, advancing contact angle followed the Wenzel, etc. theories and increased, changing the surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. In contrast, ultraviolet (UV) KrF excimer laser beam radiation altered both the topography and chemistry of the PET surface. The very nature of processing polymers with UV laser radiation inherently generates a surface that is more oxygen-rich with enhanced functional groups, which cause an increase in its polar nature. This UV laser irradiation–induced enhanced polar nature has more of an effect than topography for polymers, which, in turn, effects a decrease in advancing contact angle. In this instance the PET surface became more hydrophilic. There is now movement towards a new science-based platform from which to assess, research and establish the methodologies for wettability characteristics design and modification through controlled laser beam exposure.",
keywords = "CO2 laser, KrF excim r laser, Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Surface engineering, Wettability, Contact angle, Functional groups, Polar component",
author = "Jonathan Lawrence and David Waugh and Chris Walton and Niels Langer and Samantha Bidualt",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "(In--press)",
journal = "International Journal of Wettability Science and Technology",
issn = "2473-5035",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Surface engineering for the control of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) wettability characteristics using laser beam wavelength

AU - Lawrence, Jonathan

AU - Waugh, David

AU - Walton, Chris

AU - Langer, Niels

AU - Bidualt, Samantha

PY - 2018/12/5

Y1 - 2018/12/5

N2 - The science and technology behind using laser beam wavelength and the subsequent manipulation of a material’s polar component (through atmospheric oxygen content) to design and control the contact angle behaviour of the surface of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is presented. The findings indicate that the theory will be applicable to most polymers. When exposed to infrared (IR) CO2 laser irradiation the PET surface experienced no change in chemistry and, therefore, no change in polar component occurred. There was, however, topography change to produce a rougher surface; consequently, advancing contact angle followed the Wenzel, etc. theories and increased, changing the surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. In contrast, ultraviolet (UV) KrF excimer laser beam radiation altered both the topography and chemistry of the PET surface. The very nature of processing polymers with UV laser radiation inherently generates a surface that is more oxygen-rich with enhanced functional groups, which cause an increase in its polar nature. This UV laser irradiation–induced enhanced polar nature has more of an effect than topography for polymers, which, in turn, effects a decrease in advancing contact angle. In this instance the PET surface became more hydrophilic. There is now movement towards a new science-based platform from which to assess, research and establish the methodologies for wettability characteristics design and modification through controlled laser beam exposure.

AB - The science and technology behind using laser beam wavelength and the subsequent manipulation of a material’s polar component (through atmospheric oxygen content) to design and control the contact angle behaviour of the surface of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is presented. The findings indicate that the theory will be applicable to most polymers. When exposed to infrared (IR) CO2 laser irradiation the PET surface experienced no change in chemistry and, therefore, no change in polar component occurred. There was, however, topography change to produce a rougher surface; consequently, advancing contact angle followed the Wenzel, etc. theories and increased, changing the surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. In contrast, ultraviolet (UV) KrF excimer laser beam radiation altered both the topography and chemistry of the PET surface. The very nature of processing polymers with UV laser radiation inherently generates a surface that is more oxygen-rich with enhanced functional groups, which cause an increase in its polar nature. This UV laser irradiation–induced enhanced polar nature has more of an effect than topography for polymers, which, in turn, effects a decrease in advancing contact angle. In this instance the PET surface became more hydrophilic. There is now movement towards a new science-based platform from which to assess, research and establish the methodologies for wettability characteristics design and modification through controlled laser beam exposure.

KW - CO2 laser

KW - KrF excim r laser

KW - Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

KW - Surface engineering

KW - Wettability

KW - Contact angle

KW - Functional groups

KW - Polar component

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - (In-press)

JO - International Journal of Wettability Science and Technology

JF - International Journal of Wettability Science and Technology

SN - 2473-5035

IS - 2

ER -