Suprasegmental phonology and early reading development: Examining the relative contribution of sensitivity to stress, intonation and timing

Andrew Holliman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

432 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This chapter aims to disentangle the complex relationship between the different components of suprasegmental phonology and early reading development. Specifically, it considers the possibility that suprasegmental phonology may not be a unitary construct and explores whether the different suprasegmental components of stress or loudness, pitch or intonation, and duration or timing (Kuhn & Stahl, 2003, p. 5) are related to reading development in different ways. It draws primarily upon published research evidence and theory along with some pertinent unpublished data from two recent exploratory studies, which developed and employed a new, multi-component measure of suprasegmental phonological sensitivity. Conclusions are made regarding the need to consider disentangling different aspects of suprasegmental phonology not only theoretically but practically, in order to develop a more sophisticated understanding of its role in early reading development.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLinguistic Rhythm and Literacy
EditorsJenny Thomson, Linda Jarmulowicz
Place of PublicationAmsterdam, Netherlands
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
Pages25-50
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9789027267559
ISBN (Print)9789027244079
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Publication series

NameTrends in Language Acquisition Research
Volume17

Keywords

  • suprasegmentals
  • prosody
  • stress
  • intonation
  • timing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Suprasegmental phonology and early reading development: Examining the relative contribution of sensitivity to stress, intonation and timing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Holliman, A. (2016). Suprasegmental phonology and early reading development: Examining the relative contribution of sensitivity to stress, intonation and timing. In J. Thomson, & L. Jarmulowicz (Eds.), Linguistic Rhythm and Literacy (pp. 25-50). (Trends in Language Acquisition Research ; Vol. 17). Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Company. https://doi.org/10.1075/tilar.17.02hol