Sublexical and syntactic processing during reading: evidence from eye movements of typically developing and dyslexic readers.

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    Abstract

    Skilled, typically developing readers and children with dyslexia read correct sentences and sentences that contained verb errors that were pseudo-homophones, morphological over-regularisations or syntactic errors. All errors increased looking time but the nature of the error and participant group influenced the time course of the effects. The pseudo-homophone effect was significant in all eye-movement measures for adults (N=26), intermediate (N=37) and novice typically developing readers (N=38). This effect was larger for intermediate readers than other groups in total duration. In contrast, morphological over-regularisations increased gaze and total duration (but not first fixation) for intermediate and novice readers, and only total duration for adult readers. Syntactic errors only increased total duration. Children with dyslexia (N=19) demonstrated smaller effects of pseudo-homophones and over-regularisations than controls, but their processing of syntactic errors was similar. We conclude that dyslexic children’s difficulties with reading are linked to overreliance on phonological decoding and underspecified morphological processing, which impacts on word level reading. We highlight that the findings fit well within Grainger and Zeigler’s (2011) grain-size model of word reading. Publisher Statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Cognitive Psychology on 11th December 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/20445911.2017.1414222
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)177-197
    Number of pages21
    JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychology
    Volume30
    Issue number2
    Early online date11 Dec 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Bibliographical note

    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Cognitive Psychology on 11th December 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/20445911.2017.1414222

    Keywords

    • Reading
    • phonology
    • morphology
    • dyslexia
    • eye-movements

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