Stories of survival: Children’s narratives of psychosocial wellbeing following paediatric critical illness or injury

Joseph Manning, Pippa Hemingway, Sarah A Redsell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)
    12 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Survival from critical illness can expose children to an array of negative physical and psychological problems. While the perspective of parents and professionals have been well documented, there is limited understanding of how childhood critical care survivors make sense of their experiences in relation to psychosocial well-being. We aimed to explore long-term psychosocial well-being of childhood survivors of critical illness through their stories. A qualitative, exploratory study using serial in-depth interviews was employed. Nine children (aged 6–15 years) were recruited to the study, 6–14 months post-discharge from a paediatric intensive care unit. Qualitative art-based methods were used with a responsive interviewing technique and data were analysed using narrative psychological analysis. Four themes emerged: disrupted lives and stories; survivors revealed uncertainties in their stories as they recalled their critical care event, exposure to death and dying; talking about extreme physical vulnerability provoked anxieties, mediating between different social worlds and identities; revealed the dynamic nature of survival and getting on with life; the prospective outlook survivors had on their existence despite newly manifesting adversities. Childhood survivors’ stories identify challenges and adversities that are faced when attempting to readjust to life following critical illness that both enhance and impair psychosocial well-being.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)236-252
    Number of pages17
    JournalJournal of Child Health Care
    Volume21
    Issue number3
    Early online date30 Jun 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

    Fingerprint

    Critical Illness
    Survivors
    Pediatrics
    Survival
    Wounds and Injuries
    Critical Care
    Psychology
    Social Identification
    Pediatric Intensive Care Units
    Art
    Uncertainty
    Anxiety
    Parents
    Interviews

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright Sage Publications

    Keywords

    • nurses
    • children
    • paediatric intensive care
    • survivors
    • narratives

    Cite this

    Stories of survival : Children’s narratives of psychosocial wellbeing following paediatric critical illness or injury. / Manning, Joseph; Hemingway, Pippa; Redsell, Sarah A.

    In: Journal of Child Health Care, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 236-252.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Manning, Joseph ; Hemingway, Pippa ; Redsell, Sarah A. / Stories of survival : Children’s narratives of psychosocial wellbeing following paediatric critical illness or injury. In: Journal of Child Health Care. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 236-252.
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