Stability and continuity of parentally reported child eating behaviours and feeding practices from 2 to 5 years of age

C. Farrow, J. Blissett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research suggests that many eating behaviours are stable in children but that obesigenic eating behaviours tend to increase with age. This research explores the stability (consistency in individual levels over time) and continuity (consistency in group levels over time) of child eating behaviours and parental feeding practices in children between 2 and 5 years of age. Thirty one participants completed measures of child eating behaviours, parental feeding practices and child weight at 2 and 5 years of age. Child eating behaviours and parental feeding practices remained stable between 2 and 5 years of age. There was also good continuity in measures of parental restriction and monitoring of food intake, as well as in mean levels of children's eating behaviours and BMI over time. Mean levels of maternal pressure to eat significantly increased, whilst mean levels of desire to drink significantly decreased, between 2 and 5 years of age. These findings suggest that children's eating behaviours are stable and continuous in the period prior to 5 years of age. Further research is necessary to replicate these findings and to explore why later developmental increases are seen in children's obesigenic eating behaviours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-156
Number of pages6
JournalAppetite
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Research
Eating
Mothers
Pressure
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Child eating behaviour
  • Continuity
  • Control
  • Parental feeding practices
  • Stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Stability and continuity of parentally reported child eating behaviours and feeding practices from 2 to 5 years of age. / Farrow, C.; Blissett, J.

In: Appetite, Vol. 58, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 151-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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