Sound Through The Rabbit Hole: Sound Design Based On Reports of Auditory Hallucination

Jonathan Weinel, Stuart Cunningham, Darryl Griffiths

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As video game developers seek to provide increasing levels of realism and sophistication, there is a need for game characters to be able to exhibit psychological states including 'altered states of consciousness' (ASC) realistically. 'Auditory hallucination' (AH) is a feature of ASC in which an individual may perceive distortions to auditory perception, or hear sounds with no apparent acoustic origin. Appropriate use of game sound may enable realistic representations of these sounds in video games. However to achieve this requires rigorous approaches informed by research. This paper seeks to inform the process of designing sounds based on auditory hallucination, by reporting the outcomes of analysing nearly 2000 experience reports that describe drug-induced intoxication. Many of these reports include descriptions of auditory hallucination. Through analysis of these reports, our research establishes a classification system, which we propose can be used for designing sounds based on auditory hallucination.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAM '14 Proceedings of the 9th Audio Mostly: A Conference on Interaction With Sound
Place of PublicationUnited States
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-3032-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event9th Audio Mostly: A Conference on Interaction With Sound - Aalborg, Denmark
Duration: 1 Oct 20143 Oct 2014

Conference

Conference9th Audio Mostly
CountryDenmark
CityAalborg
Period1/10/143/10/14

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Cite this

Weinel, J., Cunningham, S., & Griffiths, D. (2014). Sound Through The Rabbit Hole: Sound Design Based On Reports of Auditory Hallucination. In AM '14 Proceedings of the 9th Audio Mostly: A Conference on Interaction With Sound [3] United States: Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2636879.2636883