Small islands' understanding of maritime security: The cases of Mauritius and Seychelles

James A. Malcolm, Linganaden Murday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The inclusion of a Sustainable Development Goal (No. 14) on the oceans by the United Nations (UN) provides formal and global recognition that the effective management of the blue economy is a key component of global development efforts. For island states, the importance of the maritime domain is unquestionable with many having responsibility for, and access to, vast areas of ocean. In the Indian Ocean region, island states have increasingly recognized this situation by placing greater emphasis on ocean policy and the opportunities the maritime domain offers. However, island states inevitably face challenges as their smaller size often means they lack the capacity to enhance their maritime domain awareness and effectively respond to insecurity. This paper seeks to shed further light on the maritime security considerations–their characteristics and influencing factors–of island states in the Indian Ocean. The paper contains a content analysis of key documents to examine the way in which maritime security challenges have been publicly communicated by island states in the region. It then utilizes additional documents and interview material to elaborate the way in which two specific states–Mauritius and Seychelles–have approached their maritime security in maritime piracy for Seychelles and drug trafficking in Mauritius. In doing this, the paper provides valuable insights into the way in which policy-makers in Indian Ocean island states understand the sustainable development–maritime security relationship.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-256
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of the Indian Ocean Region
Volume13
Issue number2
Early online date11 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

island state
Mauritius
Indian Ocean
piracy
marine policy
UNO
trafficking
content analysis
sustainable development
inclusion
ocean
United Nations
drug
responsibility
economy
lack
interview
management

Bibliographical note

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • drug trafficking
  • Indian Ocean
  • island states
  • maritime piracy
  • Maritime security
  • Mauritius
  • Seychelles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Small islands' understanding of maritime security : The cases of Mauritius and Seychelles. / Malcolm, James A.; Murday, Linganaden.

In: Journal of the Indian Ocean Region, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2017, p. 234-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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