SHOR and DESIDE: Evaluating the effectiveness of ADM training using a flight simulator

Wen Chin Li, Don Harris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There were many aeronautical decision-making (ADM) mnemonic-based methods exist. However, there is no empirical research that suggests that they are actually effective in improving decision-making. In this study a short, ADM training course was constructed around two mnemonic methods, SHOR and DESIDE. Forty-one pilots from Republic of China Tactical Training Wing participated: half received a short ADM training course and half did not. Their decision-making skill was evaluated during a series of emergency situations presented in a full-flight simulator on the dimensions of situation assessment, risk management and response time. Significant improvements were noted in the quality of pilots' situation assessment and risk management, however this was usually at the expense of speed of response. The results do strongly suggest, though, that ADM is trainable and is demonstrably effective in improving decision-making.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006
Pages2615-2619
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 16 Oct 200620 Oct 2006

Conference

Conference50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period16/10/0620/10/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Li, W. C., & Harris, D. (2006). SHOR and DESIDE: Evaluating the effectiveness of ADM training using a flight simulator. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006 (pp. 2615-2619)