Rule fragmentation in the airworthiness regulations: A human factors perspective

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract

Human error has been identified as the primary risk to flight safety. Two of the more pervasive aspects of Human Factors encountered throughout the airworthiness regulations are error and workload. However, as a result of increasing organizational inter-dependence and integration of aircraft systems it is argued that the manner in which these issues are addressed in the aviation regulations is becoming increasingly incompatible with human and organizational behavior in an airline. Workload and error are both products of complex interactions between equipment design, procedures, training and the environment. These issues cannot be regulated on a localized basis. A more systemic, holistic approach to Human Factors regulation is required. It is suggested that a Safety Case-based approach may be better used as an adjunct to existing regulations for Human Factors issues.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics
EditorsDon Harris
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages546-555
Number of pages10
Volume6781 LNAI
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-642-21741-8
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-21740-1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event9th International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics - Orlando, United States
Duration: 9 Jul 201114 Jul 2011
Conference number: 9

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Volume6781 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743

Conference

Conference9th International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics
Abbreviated titleEPCE
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period9/07/1114/07/11

Keywords

  • Accidents
  • Error
  • Regulations
  • Safety Case
  • Socio-technical systems
  • Workload

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

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  • Cite this

    Harris, D. (2011). Rule fragmentation in the airworthiness regulations: A human factors perspective. In D. Harris (Ed.), International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics (Vol. 6781 LNAI, pp. 546-555). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6781 LNCS). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21741-8_58