Rewriting

Jonathan Burrows (Artist)

Research output: Practice-Based and Non-textual ResearchPerformance

Abstract

Rewriting is the title of a 45 minute solo performance, the outcome of a six month research focussing on how seemingly disparate questions might arrive, overlap, alter, clarify and amplify each other within the act of a daily practice of choreographing. This slow and unpremeditated overlapping of knowledges and informations may seem self-evident, but stands neverthless in contradiction to a dominant model of choreography within contemporary dance, academia and funding, which assumes often that good work is the product of singular and pre-imagined ideas. It echoes Édouard Glissant's statement 'We no longer reveal totality within ourselves by lighting flashes. We approach it through the accumulation of sediments.'

Rewriting starts with an already embodied movement sequence from a lost performance which was never seen, using 108 postcards each with a statement or question from A Choreographer's Handbook, a book I wrote ten years ago. While manipulating these cards I give a simultaneous memorised talk, at times coinciding and elsewhere ignoring or digressing from the cards. The card manipulations and simultaneous lecture together map a route through unknown territory, arriving at unexpected places which we recognise when we get there. The piece touches upon the role of memory in choreography, the sense in which solo becomes a form of autobiography, the relation of language to movement, and the continuing expansion of what is termed the wider choreographic field. What clarity that arrives is an accident of the entanglement of these often inadequate or contradictory elements, and such sense as the piece has is as likely to come from the compositional strategies themselves as from any concrete meaning making within the text or images used. This practice of entanglement echoes a recent statement by the Norwegian artist Mette Edvardsen, who describes her own work as being 'the dust that accumulates through the working'.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Choreography
Entanglement
Solo
Meaning Making
Language
Manipulation
Handbook
Choreographers
Funding
Postcards
Contradictory
Overlap
Route
Accidents
Flash
Autobiography
Totality
Clarity
Sediment
Contemporary Dance

Keywords

  • Dance Performance

Cite this

Burrows, J. (Artist). (2019). Rewriting. Performance
Rewriting. Burrows, Jonathan (Artist). 2019.

Research output: Practice-Based and Non-textual ResearchPerformance

Burrows, J, Rewriting, 2019, Performance.
Burrows J (Artist). Rewriting 2019.
Burrows, Jonathan (Artist). / Rewriting. [Performance].
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