Reversing racism and the elite conspiracy: Strategies used by the British National Party leader in response to hostile media appearances

A.J. Johnson, Simon Goodman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    This paper addresses the talk of the leader of the British National Party, Nick Griffin, when he spoke on the BBC following a surge in electoral success for the party. Inclusion in these programmes demonstrated political progress for the BNP, yet ironically facilitated breadth of criticism for the party, as his appearances were met with widespread hostility and accusations of extremism. Reactive rhetoric to these criticisms is central to Griffin rebranding the party and becoming part of mainstream UK politics. Discourse analysis is used to explore how Griffin responds to such criticism during two radio programmes and one television programme between 2009 and 2010. The analysis shows how Griffin uses two interconnected strategies of (1) presenting British people as the victims, rather than the perpetrators, of racism, and (2) blaming this racism not on outside groups, but on an ill-defined 'ruling elite'. These strategies are not independent of one another and function in response to criticism to present Griffin and the BNP as not racist aggressors but respondents to anti-white racism. The implications of this strategy for the presentation and attempted rebranding of the BNP, alongside other far right and mainstream parties, are discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)156-164
    JournalDiscourse, Context and Media
    Volume2
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Television
    racism
    elite
    criticism
    leader
    radio program
    political program
    television program
    BBC
    radicalism
    discourse analysis
    rhetoric
    inclusion
    politics
    present
    Group

    Keywords

    • British National Party
    • discourse analysis
    • far-right
    • racism
    • racism denial

    Cite this

    Reversing racism and the elite conspiracy: Strategies used by the British National Party leader in response to hostile media appearances. / Johnson, A.J.; Goodman, Simon.

    In: Discourse, Context and Media, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2013, p. 156-164.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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