Rethinking mega-projects: Politics of core and host contexts at the London Olympics

Mike Duignan, Chris Ivory, Anette Hallin

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Approaches to megaprojects have largely focused on their
ability to deliver on time, to cost, and to quality. Little has been
written about power and politics which characterise megaprojects.
In this article, we draw on Law and Callon’s (1992) notion of networks
as having a local and a global aspect—what we have termed, in
relation to mega-projects; the project ‘core’ and its ‘host context’.
The focus of this article is on the relationship between the mega-
project, in this case the mega-event of the London Olympics, and
its host context; the physical spaces and political machinery on
which the project is dependent on. The analysis revealed four types
of relationships visible in the empirical case: the core territorialized the host context, excluded unruly actors, controlled space, and
controlled risk. All of these relationships may be interpreted as
strategies deployed by the mega-project to secure the resources
and political support it needed from the host context to survive.
We argue that focusing on what it is that megaprojects do to
survive, rather than what they do to create the promised outputs,
can create new insights for thinking about mega-projects.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventInternational Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference - University of Boston, Boston, United States
Duration: 11 Jun 201714 Jun 2017
https://www.dropbox.com/s/s5ehp55voru2sp7/Conference%20IRNOP%202017%20Program%20Book%20v15%20-%20lo-res.pdf?dl=0

Conference

ConferenceInternational Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference
Abbreviated titleIRNOP 2017
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period11/06/1714/06/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Olympics
Political support
Machinery
Costs
Resources
Mega-events

Keywords

  • Mega-sporting events
  • Event regulation
  • Project management
  • Events as projects
  • Security
  • Micro and small businesses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Duignan, M., Ivory, C., & Hallin, A. (2017). Rethinking mega-projects: Politics of core and host contexts at the London Olympics. Abstract from International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference, Boston, United States.

Rethinking mega-projects: Politics of core and host contexts at the London Olympics. / Duignan, Mike; Ivory, Chris; Hallin, Anette.

2017. Abstract from International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference, Boston, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Duignan, M, Ivory, C & Hallin, A 2017, 'Rethinking mega-projects: Politics of core and host contexts at the London Olympics' International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference, Boston, United States, 11/06/17 - 14/06/17, .
Duignan M, Ivory C, Hallin A. Rethinking mega-projects: Politics of core and host contexts at the London Olympics. 2017. Abstract from International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference, Boston, United States.
Duignan, Mike ; Ivory, Chris ; Hallin, Anette. / Rethinking mega-projects: Politics of core and host contexts at the London Olympics. Abstract from International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) 2017 Annual Conference, Boston, United States.
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AB - Approaches to megaprojects have largely focused on theirability to deliver on time, to cost, and to quality. Little has been written about power and politics which characterise megaprojects. In this article, we draw on Law and Callon’s (1992) notion of networksas having a local and a global aspect—what we have termed, in relation to mega-projects; the project ‘core’ and its ‘host context’. The focus of this article is on the relationship between the mega-project, in this case the mega-event of the London Olympics, and its host context; the physical spaces and political machinery on which the project is dependent on. The analysis revealed four types of relationships visible in the empirical case: the core territorialized the host context, excluded unruly actors, controlled space, and controlled risk. All of these relationships may be interpreted as strategies deployed by the mega-project to secure the resources and political support it needed from the host context to survive. We argue that focusing on what it is that megaprojects do to survive, rather than what they do to create the promised outputs, can create new insights for thinking about mega-projects.

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