Response to: Is inverted BMI really better than BMI in predicting body fatness in children?

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

    Abstract

    We thank Dr Singhal1 for their interest in our article.2 The observations made by Dr Singhal are accurate in that inverted body mass index (iBMI) predicted 0.2% greater variance in body fatness than body mass index (BMI). However, we believe our assertion that iBMI is ‘better’ than BMI in our sample population is still valid and appropriate.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1274
    JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
    Volume68
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

    Bibliographical note

    The published record of this letter to the editor is not available on the repository.

    Keywords

    • accuracy
    • body fat
    • body mass
    • child
    • childhood obesity
    • disease association
    • human
    • inverted body mass index
    • Letter
    • medical research
    • nutritional assessment
    • nutritional status
    • nutritional value
    • outcome assessment
    • prediction

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