Religious Minorities and Freedom of Religion or Belief in the UK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

By particular reference to the polity of the UK, this article discusses issues and options for groups identified as “religious minorities” in relation to issues of “religious freedom”. It does so by seeking to ensure that such contemporary socio-legal discussions are rooted empirically in the full diversity of the UK’s contemporary religious landscape, while taking account of (especially) 19th century (mainly Christian) historical antecedents. It argues that properly to understand the expansion in scope and substance of religious freedom achieved in the 19th century that account needs to be taken of the agency of the groups that benefited from this. Finally, it argues this history can be seen as a “preconfiguration” of the way in which religious minorities have themselves acted as key drivers for change in relevant 20th and 21st century UK law and social policy and could continue to do so in possible futures post-Brexit Referendum.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4
Pages (from-to)76–109
Number of pages34
JournalReligion and Human Rights: An International Journal
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Mar 2018

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religious minority
religious freedom
referendum
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Law
history
Religious Freedom
Religious Minorities
Freedom of Religion or Belief
Social Policy
Polity
Religion
Referendum
21st Century
History

Keywords

  • social policy
  • human rights
  • belief
  • minorities
  • United Kingdom
  • discrimination
  • religion
  • equality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • History
  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Cultural Studies
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Religious Minorities and Freedom of Religion or Belief in the UK. / Weller, Paul.

In: Religion and Human Rights: An International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 4, 27.03.2018, p. 76–109 .

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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