Reflecting on sexual health and young women's sexuality: business or pleasure?

M. Brown, Priscilla Dunk-West

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    3 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This chapter explains the author's recent empirical work in which thirty participants were asked to talk about their sexual selves. It explores some of the key questions about identity and the sexual self in social work. The chapter also explores the late-modern notion of reflexivity as it relates to identity generally and outlines the research design, methods and findings as well as the theoretical underpinnings of the study. It examines how the study impacts upon current understandings of the sexual self in social work. The broader implications of the de-differentiated self consider the existing template and core social work tool: assessment. The chapter describes the limitations of contemporary assessment practices and approaches as well as offering some suggestions for future research and scholarship in this important area of self-identity. It considers how the notion of a de-differentiated identity allows people to move on from more traditional notions of the self and sexuality.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work
    EditorsPriscilla Dunk-West, Trish Hafford-Letchfield
    Place of PublicationFarnham
    PublisherAshgate
    Pages61-70
    ISBN (Print)9780754678823
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

    Bibliographical note

    Used by permission of the Publishers from Reflecting on sexual health and young women's sexuality: business or pleasure?, in Sexual Identities and Sexuality in Social Work eds. Priscilla Dunk-West and Trish Hafford-Letchfield (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), pp. 61-70. Copyright © 2011.

    Keywords

    • sexual health
    • sexuality
    • young women

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