Pushed or pulled? Exploring the factors underpinning graduate start-ups and non-start-ups

Ghulam Nabi, Andreas Walmsley, Rick Holden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study explores the nature and mixture of push–pull factors in the
journey from higher education into graduate entrepreneurship. Using
longitudinal data from 15 graduates of a British university, it compares
graduates who started their own business with graduates that did not.
Importantly, both groups had initially indicated a strong desire to start a
business on completion of their degrees. Three main themes are identified:
personal characteristics; environmental support and context; and the
business idea. These are utilised to examine the similarities and differences
in the nature and mixture of push–pull factors leading either to
start-up (SU) or non-start-up (NSU). Whilst findings revealed SUs
tended to share many similarities with NSUs, differences appeared to
cluster around some personal characteristics, views of the labour market
and their business idea. The paper contributes to a more nuanced understanding
of the complexities involved in this transition. Implications for
theory, practice, and future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)481-506
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Education and Work
Volume28
Issue number5
Early online date14 Jun 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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