Psychological, psychophysiological and behavioural effects of participant-selected vs. researcher-selected music in simulated urban driving

Costas I. Karageorghis, Elias Mouchlianitis, William Payre, Garry Kuan, Luke W. Howard, Nick Reed, Andrew M. Parkes

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    Abstract

    We investigated the effect of participant-selected (PSel) and researcher-selected (RSel) music on urban driving behaviour in young men (N = 27; Mage = 20.6 years, SD = 1.9 years). A counterbalanced, within-subjects design was used with four simulated driving conditions: PSel fast-tempo music, PSel slow-tempo music, RSel music and an urban traffic-noise control. The between-subjects variable of personality (introverts vs. extroverts) was explored. The presence of PSel slow-tempo music and RSel music optimised affective valence and arousal for urban driving. NASA Task Load Index scores indicated that the urban traffic-noise control increased mental demand compared to PSel slow-tempo music. In the PSel slow-tempo condition, less use was made of the brake pedal. When compared to extroverts, introverts recorded lower mean speed and attracted lower risk ratings under PSel slow-tempo music. The utility of PSel slow-tempo and RSel music was demonstrated in terms of optimising affective state for simulated urban driving.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number103436
    JournalApplied Ergonomics
    Volume96
    Early online date1 Jun 2021
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jun 2021

    Keywords

    • Affect
    • Distraction
    • Personality
    • Road safety
    • Simulation
    • Young drivers

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Human Factors and Ergonomics
    • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
    • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
    • Engineering (miscellaneous)

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