Promoting healthy eating in pregnancy: What kind of support services do women say they want?

Ellinor K. Olander, Lou Atkinson, Jemma K. Edmunds, David P. French

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)
    29 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Aim To identify characteristics of the services and support women want to enable them to eat healthily during pregnancy to make a potential future service acceptable to this population. Background An unhealthy diet during pregnancy may have a significant influence on pregnancy outcome, either directly through nutrient deficiencies or indirectly through maternal weight gain. Many pregnant women in the United Kingdom gain too much weight in pregnancy, and this weight gain may lead to an increased risk of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes and having an obese child. Thus, there is a need for interventions aimed at improving healthy eating in pregnancy. It is crucial in developing successful interventions to understand how participation can be maximised by optimising intervention acceptability. Methods Four focus groups were conducted; two with prenatal women (n = 9) and two with postnatal women (n = 14). Discussion focused on identifying relevant characteristics of a service targeting prenatal and postnatal women's eating to ensure that a future service was acceptable to the women. Findings The participants’ responses were clustered into three broad themes: (1) early information leading to routine formation of healthier eating habits, (2) the delivery of practical sessions to increase information and (3) health professionals providing support and signposting to services. The participants reported wanting a practical service held in a convenient location, preferably led by women who have been pregnant themselves. The participants also reported wanting to be offered this service in pregnancy to help them get into a routine before they gave birth. Several suggestions for how this service should be marketed were mentioned, including through midwives and the internet. This research provides practical information for how to design support for prenatal women to increase their knowledge and practical skills regarding eating healthily during their pregnancy.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)237-243
    JournalPrimary Health Care Research and Development
    Volume13
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 7 Feb 2012

    Fingerprint

    Pregnancy
    Weight Gain
    Eating
    Gestational Diabetes
    Midwifery
    Feeding Behavior
    Pregnancy Outcome
    Pre-Eclampsia
    Healthy Diet
    Focus Groups
    Internet
    Pregnant Women
    Mothers
    Parturition
    Diet
    Weights and Measures
    Food
    Health
    Research
    Population

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

    Keywords

    • focus group
    • healthy eating
    • pregnancy
    • support

    Cite this

    Promoting healthy eating in pregnancy: What kind of support services do women say they want? / Olander, Ellinor K.; Atkinson, Lou; Edmunds, Jemma K.; French, David P.

    In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, Vol. 13, No. 3, 07.02.2012, p. 237-243.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Olander, Ellinor K. ; Atkinson, Lou ; Edmunds, Jemma K. ; French, David P. / Promoting healthy eating in pregnancy: What kind of support services do women say they want?. In: Primary Health Care Research and Development. 2012 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 237-243.
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