Privacy, Security and Politics: Current Issues and Future Prospects

Vladlena Benson, Umut Turksen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Individual Privacy and National Security have been seen as notions with a conflicting impact. As seen in the UK general election 2017, security has taken a prominent role on the Conservative Party agenda while public perceptions on privacy were split. This paper reviews the election manifestos on privacy and security. We use the pre-election YouGov survey of 2017 UK respondents to understand views of the public by age groups and gender. While there is a general support for the legislation aimed at strengthening the national security and crime prevention, such as the Investigatory Powers Act 2016, the younger segment of UK population are increasingly concerned with the infringement of their privacy (both in traditional and online settings). These contrasting views may explain the outcome of the general election in 2017 and offer open questions for legislators.
Original languageEnglish
Article number22(4)
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalCommunications Law - Journal of Computer, Media and Telecommunications Law
Volume22
Issue number4
Early online date1 Dec 2017
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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National security
privacy
politics
Crime
election
national security
election manifesto
conservative party
crime prevention
age group
legislation
act
gender

Keywords

  • Privacy online
  • Cyber-security

Cite this

Privacy, Security and Politics : Current Issues and Future Prospects. / Benson, Vladlena ; Turksen, Umut.

In: Communications Law - Journal of Computer, Media and Telecommunications Law, Vol. 22, No. 4, 22(4), 01.12.2017, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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