Prevalence, dynamic risk factors and the efficacy of primary interventions for adolescent dating violence: An international review

E. Leen, E. Sorbring, M. Mawer, Emma Holdsworth, B. Helsing, Erica Bowen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    71 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Adolescent dating violence is a pressing international issue: yet, there have been few attempts to collate the international evidence regarding this phenomenon. This article reviews contemporary evidence from Europe and North America on prevalence, dynamic risk factors, and the efficacy of intervention programs for adolescent dating violence. Prevalence findings suggest that victimization rates are comparable across Europe and North America. Although individual studies report differing prevalences, the overall hierarchy of violence types – in which psychological/emotional violence is most and sexual violence least prevalent – is consistent across almost all investigations. Four dynamic risk factors for perpetration are identified: peer influence, substance use, psychological adjustment and competencies, and attitudes towards violence. Peer influences and attitudes towards violence appear to be the most extensively evidenced factors in the literature. Nine existing intervention programs are identified, all located within North America. Intervention results are mixed, with some evaluations reporting significant long-term benefits while others report positive intervention effects dissipate throughout follow-up. Tentative analysis suggests that programs focused on behavioral change may elicit sustainable effects more readily. However, this is difficult to ascertain with no data on program repetitions and variations across intervention pedagogy and sample. Concerns with existing research and interventions and possible future directions are discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)159–174
    JournalAggression and Violent Behavior
    Volume18
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Violence
    North America
    Crime Victims
    Sex Offenses
    Teaching
    Psychology
    Intimate Partner Violence
    Research
    Peer Influence

    Keywords

    • Adolescent dating violence
    • Violence prevalence
    • Violence risk factors
    • Violence intervention program
    • Domestic violence
    • Literature review

    Cite this

    Prevalence, dynamic risk factors and the efficacy of primary interventions for adolescent dating violence: An international review. / Leen, E.; Sorbring, E.; Mawer, M.; Holdsworth, Emma; Helsing, B.; Bowen, Erica.

    In: Aggression and Violent Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2013, p. 159–174.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{c1d3d57d3ad5421cacab990b95b7631d,
    title = "Prevalence, dynamic risk factors and the efficacy of primary interventions for adolescent dating violence: An international review",
    abstract = "Adolescent dating violence is a pressing international issue: yet, there have been few attempts to collate the international evidence regarding this phenomenon. This article reviews contemporary evidence from Europe and North America on prevalence, dynamic risk factors, and the efficacy of intervention programs for adolescent dating violence. Prevalence findings suggest that victimization rates are comparable across Europe and North America. Although individual studies report differing prevalences, the overall hierarchy of violence types – in which psychological/emotional violence is most and sexual violence least prevalent – is consistent across almost all investigations. Four dynamic risk factors for perpetration are identified: peer influence, substance use, psychological adjustment and competencies, and attitudes towards violence. Peer influences and attitudes towards violence appear to be the most extensively evidenced factors in the literature. Nine existing intervention programs are identified, all located within North America. Intervention results are mixed, with some evaluations reporting significant long-term benefits while others report positive intervention effects dissipate throughout follow-up. Tentative analysis suggests that programs focused on behavioral change may elicit sustainable effects more readily. However, this is difficult to ascertain with no data on program repetitions and variations across intervention pedagogy and sample. Concerns with existing research and interventions and possible future directions are discussed.",
    keywords = "Adolescent dating violence, Violence prevalence, Violence risk factors, Violence intervention program, Domestic violence, Literature review",
    author = "E. Leen and E. Sorbring and M. Mawer and Emma Holdsworth and B. Helsing and Erica Bowen",
    year = "2013",
    doi = "10.1016/j.avb.2012.11.015",
    language = "English",
    volume = "18",
    pages = "159–174",
    journal = "Aggression and Violent Behavior",
    issn = "1359-1789",
    publisher = "Elsevier Masson",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Prevalence, dynamic risk factors and the efficacy of primary interventions for adolescent dating violence: An international review

    AU - Leen, E.

    AU - Sorbring, E.

    AU - Mawer, M.

    AU - Holdsworth, Emma

    AU - Helsing, B.

    AU - Bowen, Erica

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Adolescent dating violence is a pressing international issue: yet, there have been few attempts to collate the international evidence regarding this phenomenon. This article reviews contemporary evidence from Europe and North America on prevalence, dynamic risk factors, and the efficacy of intervention programs for adolescent dating violence. Prevalence findings suggest that victimization rates are comparable across Europe and North America. Although individual studies report differing prevalences, the overall hierarchy of violence types – in which psychological/emotional violence is most and sexual violence least prevalent – is consistent across almost all investigations. Four dynamic risk factors for perpetration are identified: peer influence, substance use, psychological adjustment and competencies, and attitudes towards violence. Peer influences and attitudes towards violence appear to be the most extensively evidenced factors in the literature. Nine existing intervention programs are identified, all located within North America. Intervention results are mixed, with some evaluations reporting significant long-term benefits while others report positive intervention effects dissipate throughout follow-up. Tentative analysis suggests that programs focused on behavioral change may elicit sustainable effects more readily. However, this is difficult to ascertain with no data on program repetitions and variations across intervention pedagogy and sample. Concerns with existing research and interventions and possible future directions are discussed.

    AB - Adolescent dating violence is a pressing international issue: yet, there have been few attempts to collate the international evidence regarding this phenomenon. This article reviews contemporary evidence from Europe and North America on prevalence, dynamic risk factors, and the efficacy of intervention programs for adolescent dating violence. Prevalence findings suggest that victimization rates are comparable across Europe and North America. Although individual studies report differing prevalences, the overall hierarchy of violence types – in which psychological/emotional violence is most and sexual violence least prevalent – is consistent across almost all investigations. Four dynamic risk factors for perpetration are identified: peer influence, substance use, psychological adjustment and competencies, and attitudes towards violence. Peer influences and attitudes towards violence appear to be the most extensively evidenced factors in the literature. Nine existing intervention programs are identified, all located within North America. Intervention results are mixed, with some evaluations reporting significant long-term benefits while others report positive intervention effects dissipate throughout follow-up. Tentative analysis suggests that programs focused on behavioral change may elicit sustainable effects more readily. However, this is difficult to ascertain with no data on program repetitions and variations across intervention pedagogy and sample. Concerns with existing research and interventions and possible future directions are discussed.

    KW - Adolescent dating violence

    KW - Violence prevalence

    KW - Violence risk factors

    KW - Violence intervention program

    KW - Domestic violence

    KW - Literature review

    U2 - 10.1016/j.avb.2012.11.015

    DO - 10.1016/j.avb.2012.11.015

    M3 - Article

    VL - 18

    SP - 159

    EP - 174

    JO - Aggression and Violent Behavior

    JF - Aggression and Violent Behavior

    SN - 1359-1789

    IS - 1

    ER -