Pregnant smokers’ perceptions of specialist smoking cessation services

Sarah J. Butterworth, Elizabeth Sparkes, A. Trout, Katherine Brown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Introduction: Women who continue to smoke during pregnancy are at risk of smoking-related diseases, maternity complications and expose the foetus to risks of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The number of women smoking at the time of delivery is estimated at 13.5% in England and 15.8% in the West Midlands. However, the prevalence can be elevated in certain areas, such as north Solihull. Aims: This research consults past, current and non-users of specialist smoking cessation services and reports pregnant women's views of smoking cessation delivery and potential service developments. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with 19 participants with experience of prenatal smoking. Findings: Data was analysed using thematic analysis. The main themes included: (1) improving access to clear, sensitive information on smoking and pregnancy; (2) perceptions of existing services; (3) improving current services: the right delivery and the right person; and (4) encouraging participation of pregnant smokers. Conclusions: In this area, pregnant smokers wanted easily-accessible, empathetic, non-judgemental and flexible support more than incentives or rewards to quit smoking. They also stated a preference for group cessation support as they believed that peer support would be advantageous.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)85-97
    JournalJournal of Smoking Cessation
    Volume9
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2013

    Fingerprint

    Smoking Cessation
    Smoking
    Pregnancy
    Perinatal Mortality
    Focus Groups
    Reward
    Smoke
    England
    Motivation
    Pregnant Women
    Fetus
    Morbidity
    Research

    Bibliographical note

    There is no full text available on the repository at this time.

    Keywords

    • Smoking cessation
    • pregnancy
    • patient involvement
    • qualitative

    Cite this

    Pregnant smokers’ perceptions of specialist smoking cessation services. / Butterworth, Sarah J.; Sparkes, Elizabeth; Trout, A.; Brown, Katherine.

    In: Journal of Smoking Cessation, Vol. 9, No. 2, 11.10.2013, p. 85-97.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Butterworth, Sarah J. ; Sparkes, Elizabeth ; Trout, A. ; Brown, Katherine. / Pregnant smokers’ perceptions of specialist smoking cessation services. In: Journal of Smoking Cessation. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 85-97.
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