Pre-cooling moderately enhances visual discrimination during exercise in the heat

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Abstract

Pre-cooling has been reported to attenuate the increase in core temperature, although, information regarding the effects of pre-cooling on cognitive function is limited. The present study investigated the effects of pre-cooling on visual discrimination during exercise in the heat. Eight male recreational runners completed 90 min of treadmill running at 65% 2max in the heat [32.4 ± 0.9°C and 46.8 ± 6.4% relative humidity (r.h.)] on two occasions in a randomised, counterbalanced crossover design. Participants underwent pre-cooling by means of water immersion (20.3 ± 0.3°C) for 60 min or remained seated for 60 min in a laboratory (20.2 ± 1.7°C and 60.2 ± 2.5% r.h.). Rectal temperature (Trec) and mean skin temperature (Tskin) were monitored throughout the protocol. At 30-min intervals participants performed a visual discrimination task. Following pre-cooling, Trec (P = 0.040; = 0.48) was moderately lower at 0 and 30 min and Tskin (P = 0.003; = 0.75) lower to a large extent at 0 min of exercise. Visual discrimination was moderately more accurate at 60 and 90 min of exercise following pre-cooling (P = 0.067; = 0.40). Pre-cooling resulted in small improvements in visual discrimination sensitivity (F1,7 = 2.188; P = 0.183; = 0.24), criterion (F1,7 = 1.298; P = 0.292; = 0.16) and bias (F1,7 = 2.202; P = 0.181; = 0.24). Pre-cooling moderately improves visual discrimination accuracy during exercise in the heat. Publisher Statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 23rd March 2016, available online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2016.1164885
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-360
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume35
Issue number4
Early online date23 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Hot Temperature
Humidity
Temperature
Skin Temperature
Manuscripts
Immersion
Running
Cross-Over Studies
Cognition
Sports
Discrimination (Psychology)
Water

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 23rd March 2016, available online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2016.1164885

Keywords

  • Core temperature
  • cold water immersion
  • cognitive function

Cite this

Pre-cooling moderately enhances visual discrimination during exercise in the heat. / Clarke, Neil D.; Duncan, Michael J.; Smith, Mike; Hankey, J.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 35, No. 4, 2017, p. 355-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Pre-cooling has been reported to attenuate the increase in core temperature, although, information regarding the effects of pre-cooling on cognitive function is limited. The present study investigated the effects of pre-cooling on visual discrimination during exercise in the heat. Eight male recreational runners completed 90 min of treadmill running at 65{\%} 2max in the heat [32.4 ± 0.9°C and 46.8 ± 6.4{\%} relative humidity (r.h.)] on two occasions in a randomised, counterbalanced crossover design. Participants underwent pre-cooling by means of water immersion (20.3 ± 0.3°C) for 60 min or remained seated for 60 min in a laboratory (20.2 ± 1.7°C and 60.2 ± 2.5{\%} r.h.). Rectal temperature (Trec) and mean skin temperature (Tskin) were monitored throughout the protocol. At 30-min intervals participants performed a visual discrimination task. Following pre-cooling, Trec (P = 0.040; = 0.48) was moderately lower at 0 and 30 min and Tskin (P = 0.003; = 0.75) lower to a large extent at 0 min of exercise. Visual discrimination was moderately more accurate at 60 and 90 min of exercise following pre-cooling (P = 0.067; = 0.40). Pre-cooling resulted in small improvements in visual discrimination sensitivity (F1,7 = 2.188; P = 0.183; = 0.24), criterion (F1,7 = 1.298; P = 0.292; = 0.16) and bias (F1,7 = 2.202; P = 0.181; = 0.24). Pre-cooling moderately improves visual discrimination accuracy during exercise in the heat. Publisher Statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 23rd March 2016, available online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2016.1164885",
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