An exploratory examination of practitioners’ and offenders’ perceptions of the effectiveness of an individual workbook approach for treating intimate partner violence offenders

Kate Walker, Sarah J. Brown, Katy Hicks

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)
    52 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Perceptions of probation staff and offenders were explored regarding the effectiveness of an individual workbook intervention for intimate partner violence (IPV), based on the Integrated Domestic Abuse Programme, a group intervention for IPV offenders in the UK. Using thematic analysis, interview transcripts from 11 probation staff and 2 offenders were examined. Two global themes were identified: Promising alternative to IPV interventions, representing positive perceptions of the workbook and Compromises made in using the workbook, reflecting negative perceptions and challenges. The identified strengths were that the workbook provided staff with a framework to deliver individualised intervention (deemed to be more difficult in group treatment formats), employed a strength-based and directive approach to discussions to develop offenders’ skills and behaviours that may assist in improving deficits linked to their use of violence. However, identified problematic factors related to treatment integrity including delivery, content and format, its capacity to create change, and a need for further development. As a concept the workbook intervention should not be discounted since it offers an opportunity to offer individualised treatment and interventions to those unable to attend groups; however, the intervention requires development and further research to examine its effectiveness. Publisher Statement - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime and Law on 30th June 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2016.1207769
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)977-999
    Number of pages23
    JournalPsychology, Crime & Law
    Volume22
    Issue number10
    Early online date30 Jun 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2016

    Fingerprint

    offender
    violence
    examination
    probation
    Manuscripts
    staff
    Crime
    Violence
    Therapeutics
    Interviews
    Psychology
    Group
    Intimate Partner Violence
    compromise
    integrity
    Research
    deficit
    abuse
    psychology
    offense

    Keywords

    • Intimate partner violence
    • wordbook intervention
    • community-based intervention
    • Integrated Domestic Abuse Programme
    • individual treatment approach

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Perceptions of probation staff and offenders were explored regarding the effectiveness of an individual workbook intervention for intimate partner violence (IPV), based on the Integrated Domestic Abuse Programme, a group intervention for IPV offenders in the UK. Using thematic analysis, interview transcripts from 11 probation staff and 2 offenders were examined. Two global themes were identified: Promising alternative to IPV interventions, representing positive perceptions of the workbook and Compromises made in using the workbook, reflecting negative perceptions and challenges. The identified strengths were that the workbook provided staff with a framework to deliver individualised intervention (deemed to be more difficult in group treatment formats), employed a strength-based and directive approach to discussions to develop offenders’ skills and behaviours that may assist in improving deficits linked to their use of violence. However, identified problematic factors related to treatment integrity including delivery, content and format, its capacity to create change, and a need for further development. As a concept the workbook intervention should not be discounted since it offers an opportunity to offer individualised treatment and interventions to those unable to attend groups; however, the intervention requires development and further research to examine its effectiveness. Publisher Statement - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime and Law on 30th June 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2016.1207769",
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