Post-disaster reconstruction strategies: a case study in Taiwan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

After the Ji-Ji Earthquake in 1999, The Taiwanese Government worked to establish a more holistic disaster management system (Maa 2011); however the Morakot 88 Flood Disaster in 2009 then challenged the capabilities of the emergency response systems in post disaster response, recovery and reconstruction (Lu et al. 2011). Although the Government has invested heavily and made a serious effort to improve post-disaster housing projects, the debates on the development plans have generated tension between the Government and the aboriginal groups (Quan 2010).

Both good practice and lessons learned can be identified from these cases, and it is important that they should be shared with as wide an audience as possible within Taiwan and regions affected. In particular, the way the government works together with NGOs and also the adoption of a more holistic post disaster reconstruction framework are important aspects of this work.

This chapter aims to evaluate the post disaster reconstruction strategies implemented in particular after the Typhoon Morakot flood disaster in 2009. The objectives include firstly, establishing the context of Taiwan and examining how climate change has already affected the island; secondly, exploring post disaster management strategies taken to respond to these phenomena; thirdly, providing an extensive examination of the housing projects in relation to the affected populations post Typhoon Morakot; and finally, share the best practice for other countries confronted with same or similar issues and making recommendations for the planning of reconstruction projects.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClimate Hazard Crises in Asian Societies and Environments
EditorsTroy Sternberg
Place of PublicationOxon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages11-33
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-3155-7241-3
ISBN (Print)978-1-4724-4646-6
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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disaster
Taiwan
reconstruction
housing project
disaster management
typhoon
natural disaster
best practice
housing
nongovernmental organization
management
non-governmental organization
earthquake
climate change
examination
planning
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Chen, Y-F. (2017). Post-disaster reconstruction strategies: a case study in Taiwan. In T. Sternberg (Ed.), Climate Hazard Crises in Asian Societies and Environments (pp. 11-33). Oxon: Routledge.

Post-disaster reconstruction strategies: a case study in Taiwan. / Chen, Yung-Fang.

Climate Hazard Crises in Asian Societies and Environments. ed. / Troy Sternberg. Oxon : Routledge, 2017. p. 11-33.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chen, Y-F 2017, Post-disaster reconstruction strategies: a case study in Taiwan. in T Sternberg (ed.), Climate Hazard Crises in Asian Societies and Environments. Routledge, Oxon, pp. 11-33.
Chen Y-F. Post-disaster reconstruction strategies: a case study in Taiwan. In Sternberg T, editor, Climate Hazard Crises in Asian Societies and Environments. Oxon: Routledge. 2017. p. 11-33
Chen, Yung-Fang. / Post-disaster reconstruction strategies: a case study in Taiwan. Climate Hazard Crises in Asian Societies and Environments. editor / Troy Sternberg. Oxon : Routledge, 2017. pp. 11-33
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