Possible Mechanism behind the Hard-to-Swallow Property of Oil Seed Pastes

Andrew J. Rosenthal, Seckin Yilmaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Roasted and crushed oil-rich seeds, such as sesame paste and peanut butter, both share a common structure and elicit an apparent sensation of thickening in the mouth. Working with sesame paste, as an example, the force needed to compress sesame paste:water mixtures peaked at 25% added water. The adhesive force required to pull a plunger from the surface was bimodal with peaks at around 15 and 25% hydration. It is postulated that when introduced to the mouth, water from the saliva is absorbed by the paste leading to a hard, adhesive material that sticks to the palate and the tongue, making these materials hard to swallow. It is hypothesized that the shared hard-to-swallow behaviour exhibited by other oil seed pastes/butters is due to a similar hydration process in the mouth.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2077-2084
JournalInternational Journal of Food Properties
Volume18
Issue number9
Early online date13 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Ointments
seed oils
Sesamum
Seeds
Oils
Sesamum indicum
Mouth
mouth
Butter
adhesives
Adhesives
Water
peanut butter
palate
Palate
water
butter
Deglutition
saliva
tongue

Bibliographical note

This paper is not available on the repository
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the International Journal of Food Properties on 13 Dec 2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10942912.2013.862633.

Keywords

  • Bolus
  • Deglutition
  • Hydration
  • Oral processing
  • Peanut butter
  • Sesame paste
  • Swallow

Cite this

Possible Mechanism behind the Hard-to-Swallow Property of Oil Seed Pastes. / Rosenthal, Andrew J.; Yilmaz, Seckin.

In: International Journal of Food Properties, Vol. 18, No. 9, 2015, p. 2077-2084.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosenthal, Andrew J. ; Yilmaz, Seckin. / Possible Mechanism behind the Hard-to-Swallow Property of Oil Seed Pastes. In: International Journal of Food Properties. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 2077-2084.
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