Politicizing food security governance through participation: opportunities and opposition

Jessica Duncan, Priscilla Claeys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since the 2007/08 food price crisis there has been a proliferation of multi-stakeholder processes (MSPs) devoted to bringing diverse perspectives together to inform and improve food security policy. While much of the literature highlights the positive contributions to be gained from an opening-up of traditionally state-led processes, there is a strong critique emerging to show that, in many instances, MSPs have de-politicizing effects. In this paper, we scrutinize MSPs in relation to de-politicization. We argue that re-building sustainable and just food systems requires alternative visions that can best be made visible through politicized policy processes. Focusing on three key conditions of politicization, we examine the UN Committee on World Food Security as a MSP where we see a process of politicization playing out through the endorsement of the ‘most-affected’ principle, which is in turn being actively contested by traditionally powerful actors. We conclude that there is a need to implement and reinforce mechanisms that deliberately politicize participation in MSPs, notably by clearly distinguishing between states and other stakeholders, as well as between categories of non-state actors.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1411-1424
Number of pages14
JournalFood Security
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 26 Nov 2018

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Food Supply
governance
food security
stakeholders
stakeholder
opposition
food
Food
Nutrition Policy
participation
United Nations
politicization
food prices
committees
security policy
proliferation
UNO

Bibliographical note

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use,
distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate
credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the
Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

  • Civil Society
  • ciCommittee on World Food Security
  • depoliticisation
  • multi-stakeholder processes
  • Participation
  • politicization

Cite this

Politicizing food security governance through participation : opportunities and opposition. / Duncan, Jessica; Claeys, Priscilla.

In: Food Security, Vol. 10, No. 6, 26.11.2018, p. 1411-1424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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