Police Misconduct: Mapping its location, seriousness and theoretical underpinning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article draws attention to the geography of police officer misconduct. The basis for doing so rests in the uneven manner by which police officers have been found to view areas, target inhabitants as crime suspects, treat them when victims of crime and interact with them relative to other areas (Sun et al., 2008; Rossler and Terrill, 2012). Such areas have tended to be characterized by high deprivation and low social capital (Loftus, 2012) and have given rise to numerous complaints, particularly concerning the use of excessive force by police officers (Lersch, 1998). The value of understanding police officer misconduct geography, meanwhile, rests in ensuring good policing and its legitimacy over time.

Publisher Statement: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice following peer review. The version of record Moss, B 2017, 'Police Misconduct: Mapping its location, seriousness and theoretical underpinning' Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice. , vol (in press), pp. (in press) is available online at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/police/pax077
LanguageEnglish
Pages(in press)
JournalPolicing: A Journal of Policy and Practice.
Volume(in press)
Early online date24 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Oct 2017

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police officer
police
offense
geography
peer review
deprivation
complaint
inhabitant
social capital
legitimacy
Values

Bibliographical note

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice following peer review. The version of record Moss, B 2017, 'Police Misconduct: Mapping its location, seriousness and theoretical underpinning' Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice. , vol (in press), pp. (in press) is available online at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/police/pax077

Keywords

  • police
  • misconduct
  • geography

Cite this

Police Misconduct : Mapping its location, seriousness and theoretical underpinning. / Moss, Brian.

In: Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice. , Vol. (in press), 24.10.2017, p. (in press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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