Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires

Nigel Hardiman, Kristina Charlotte Dietz, Ian Bride, Louis Passfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
19 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume59
Issue number1
Early online date17 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Bibliographical note

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

  • Human-mediated dispersal
  • Seed attachment
  • Tourism impacts
  • Weeds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Ecology
  • Pollution

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this