Physicochemical characteristics and shelf life of beef treated with high‐intensity ultrasound

Cristina Valenzuela, Ivan Adrian Garcia‐Galicia, Larysa Paniwnyk, Alma Delia Alarcon‐Rojo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored the impact of high-intensity ultrasound (US) (HIU; 40 kHz, 11 W/cm 2) on physicochemical characteristics and shelf life of Semitendinosus beef muscle during storage for 0, 3, 6, and 9 d at 4°C. HIU decreased the pH and the global difference of color along with the storage (from 5.99 to 1.43 ΔΕ) in comparison with not sonicated beef. The drip loss of beef decreased with US and with storage, but it was similar to the control at the end of 9 d of storage. No difference in water-holding capacity and SF of sonicated beef was observed compared to the controls. Counts of mesophilic, psychrophilic, Staphylococcus spp., and coliform bacteria decreased with HIU application. HIU has proven to be a technology that could be efficiently used to increase the shelf life of beef retaining its technological quality. Practical applications: In meat processing, sonication can serve as an alternative processing technique to the traditional methods of meat preservation and is considered a green, versatile, and emerging technology. Ultrasonication was remarkably effective for inactivation of beef microbiota showing a growing effect with storage time. US has minimal effects on physicochemical properties of fresh and stored beef. Hence, these findings offer an opportunity for the meat industry to increase the shelf life of beef retaining its technological quality.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere15350
JournalJournal of Food Processing and Preservation
Volume45
Issue number4
Early online date18 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • General Chemical Engineering
  • General Chemistry
  • Food Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Physicochemical characteristics and shelf life of beef treated with high‐intensity ultrasound'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this