Perceptions of risk: A review of the effects of individual and community-level variables on perceptions of risk

S. Hicks, Sarah J. Brown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This review consolidates the research on perceptions of risk and its antecedents to improve our understanding of the factors that influence perceptions of risk. The evidence is evaluated against the available models, theories and explanations. Online databases, relevant journals and books were searched using keywords resulting in a total of 30 papers being included in this review. It was found that the literature provided support for previous victimization, experienced both directly and vicariously, gender, race, income, perceptions of crime rates and incivilities, having a consistent effect on perceptions of risk of criminal victimization. Perceived risk was shown to have a strong influence on fear of crime, and the relationship was also found by one study to be reciprocal (Rader et al., 2007). The risk interpretation model (Ferraro, 1995) was supported by the literature but is still in need of continuing development in light of new research. The findings could be used to help reduce risk perception to a level more in line with actual risk and thus reduce fear of crime and in turn increase quality of life.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)249-267
    JournalInternational Review of Victimology
    Volume19
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    community
    victimization
    offense
    anxiety
    model theory
    crime rate
    quality of life
    income
    interpretation
    gender
    evidence
    literature

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this item is not available from the repository.

    Keywords

    • crime
    • fear of crime
    • perceived risk
    • perceptions of risk
    • victimization

    Cite this

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