Patients’ perception of the information security management in health centers: the role of organizational and human factors

Hamid Peikari, T Ramya, Mahmood Shah, MC Lo

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Abstract

Background: Researchers paid little attention to understanding the association of organizational and human factors with patients’ perceived security in the context of health organizations. This study aims to address numerous gaps in this context. Patients’ perceptions about employees’ training on security issues, monitoring on security issues, ethics, physical & technical protection and trust in hospitals were identified as organizational and human factors. Methods: After the development of 12 hypotheses, a quantitative, cross-sectional, self-administered survey method was applied to collect data in 9 hospitals in Iran. After the collection of 382 usable questionnaires, the partial least square structural modeling was applied to examine the hypotheses and it was found that 11 hypotheses were empirically supported. Results: The results suggest that patients’ trust in hospitals can significantly predict their perceived security but no significant associations were found between patients’ physical protection mechanisms in the hospital and their perceived information security in a hospital. We also found that patients’ perceptions about the physical protection mechanism of a hospital can significantly predict their trust in hospitals which is a novel finding by this research. Conclusions: The findings imply that hospitals should formulate policies to improve patients’ perception about such factors, which ultimately lead to their perceived security.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102
Number of pages13
JournalBMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2018

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Information Management
Health
Iran
Least-Squares Analysis
Ethics
Research Personnel
Organizations

Bibliographical note

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • Security
  • Trust
  • Technical and physical protection
  • Monitoring
  • Training
  • Ethics

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Researchers paid little attention to understanding the association of organizational and human factors with patients’ perceived security in the context of health organizations. This study aims to address numerous gaps in this context. Patients’ perceptions about employees’ training on security issues, monitoring on security issues, ethics, physical & technical protection and trust in hospitals were identified as organizational and human factors. Methods: After the development of 12 hypotheses, a quantitative, cross-sectional, self-administered survey method was applied to collect data in 9 hospitals in Iran. After the collection of 382 usable questionnaires, the partial least square structural modeling was applied to examine the hypotheses and it was found that 11 hypotheses were empirically supported. Results: The results suggest that patients’ trust in hospitals can significantly predict their perceived security but no significant associations were found between patients’ physical protection mechanisms in the hospital and their perceived information security in a hospital. We also found that patients’ perceptions about the physical protection mechanism of a hospital can significantly predict their trust in hospitals which is a novel finding by this research. Conclusions: The findings imply that hospitals should formulate policies to improve patients’ perception about such factors, which ultimately lead to their perceived security.",
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