Patient safety culture in care homes for older people: a scoping review

Emily Gartshore, Justin Waring, Stephen Timmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing incidents such as medication errors and falls. However, research and developments in safety culture has predominantly taken place in hospital settings, with relatively less attention given to establishing a safety culture in care homes. Despite safety culture being accepted as an important quality indicator across all health and social care settings, the understanding of culture within social care settings remains far less developed than within hospitals. It is therefore important that the existing evidence base is gathered and reviewed in order to understand safety culture in care homes.

Methods
A scoping review was undertaken to describe the availability of evidence related to care homes’ patient safety culture, what these studies focused on, and identify any knowledge gaps within the existing literature. Included papers were each reviewed by two authors for eligibility and to draw out information relevant to the scoping review.

Results
Twenty-four empirical papers and one literature review were included within the scoping review. The collective evidence demonstrated that safety culture research is largely based in the USA, within Nursing Homes rather than Residential Home settings. Moreover, the scoping review revealed that empirical evidence has predominantly used quantitative measures, and therefore the deeper levels of culture have not been captured in the evidence base.

Conclusions
Safety culture in care homes is a topic that has not been extensively researched. The review highlights a number of key gaps in the evidence base, which future research into safety culture in care home should attempt to address.
Original languageEnglish
Article number752
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Safety Management
Patient Safety
Home Care Services
Medication Errors
Nursing Homes
Research
Delivery of Health Care

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver
(http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • Care home
  • Residential home
  • Nursing home
  • Safety culture
  • Organizational culture
  • scoping review
  • Scoping study

Cite this

Patient safety culture in care homes for older people : a scoping review. / Gartshore, Emily; Waring, Justin; Timmons, Stephen.

In: BMC Health Services Research, Vol. 17, 752, 21.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gartshore, Emily ; Waring, Justin ; Timmons, Stephen. / Patient safety culture in care homes for older people : a scoping review. In: BMC Health Services Research. 2017 ; Vol. 17.
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