One week of magnesium supplementation lowers IL-6, muscle soreness and increases post-exercise blood glucose in response to downhill running

Charles Steward, Yue Zhou, Gary Keane, Matthew David Cook, Yunyi Liu, Tom Cullen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Magnesium supplementation modulates glucose metabolism and inflammation, which could influence exercise performance and recovery. This study investigated the effect of magnesium intake on physiological responses and performance during eccentric exercise and recovery. Methods Nine male recreational runners completed a counterbalanced, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, registered at ClinicalTrial.gov. Participants consumed low magnesium diets and were supplemented with 500 mg/day of magnesium (SUP) or placebo (CON) for 7 days prior to a 10 km downhill (− 10%) running time trial (TT), separated by a 2-week washout period. At baseline and 24 h post-TT, maximal muscle force was measured. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured at rest, 0 h, 1 h and 24 h post-TT. Muscle soreness was measured at the previous times plus 48 h and 72 h post. Glucose and lactate were measured during the TT. Results The main effect of condition was detected for IL-6 (SUP: 1.36 ± 0.66 vs CON: 2.06 ± 1.14 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.54), sIL-6R (SUP: 27,615 ± 8446 vs CON: 24,368 ± 7806 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.41) and muscle soreness (P < 0.01, η2 = 0.67). Recovery of blood glucose and muscle soreness were enhanced in SUP post-TT. There were no differences in glucose and lactate during the TT, or post measures of CK and maximal muscle force. Conclusion Magnesium supplementation reduced the IL-6 response, enhanced recovery of blood glucose, and muscle soreness after strenuous exercise, but did not improve performance or functional measures of recovery.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume(In -Press)
Early online date17 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Oct 2019

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Myalgia
Magnesium
Blood Glucose
Interleukin-6
Interleukin-6 Receptors
Glucose
Lactic Acid
Placebos
MM Form Creatine Kinase
Creatine Kinase
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Inflammation
Muscles

Keywords

  • Magnesium
  • Interleukin-6
  • Exercise
  • Recovery
  • Glucose
  • Muscle soreness

Cite this

One week of magnesium supplementation lowers IL-6, muscle soreness and increases post-exercise blood glucose in response to downhill running. / Steward, Charles; Zhou, Yue ; Keane, Gary; Cook, Matthew David; Liu, Yunyi; Cullen, Tom.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. (In -Press), 17.10.2019, p. (In-Press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steward, Charles ; Zhou, Yue ; Keane, Gary ; Cook, Matthew David ; Liu, Yunyi ; Cullen, Tom. / One week of magnesium supplementation lowers IL-6, muscle soreness and increases post-exercise blood glucose in response to downhill running. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2019 ; Vol. (In -Press). pp. (In-Press).
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abstract = "Purpose Magnesium supplementation modulates glucose metabolism and inflammation, which could influence exercise performance and recovery. This study investigated the effect of magnesium intake on physiological responses and performance during eccentric exercise and recovery. Methods Nine male recreational runners completed a counterbalanced, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, registered at ClinicalTrial.gov. Participants consumed low magnesium diets and were supplemented with 500 mg/day of magnesium (SUP) or placebo (CON) for 7 days prior to a 10 km downhill (− 10{\%}) running time trial (TT), separated by a 2-week washout period. At baseline and 24 h post-TT, maximal muscle force was measured. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured at rest, 0 h, 1 h and 24 h post-TT. Muscle soreness was measured at the previous times plus 48 h and 72 h post. Glucose and lactate were measured during the TT. Results The main effect of condition was detected for IL-6 (SUP: 1.36 ± 0.66 vs CON: 2.06 ± 1.14 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.54), sIL-6R (SUP: 27,615 ± 8446 vs CON: 24,368 ± 7806 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.41) and muscle soreness (P < 0.01, η2 = 0.67). Recovery of blood glucose and muscle soreness were enhanced in SUP post-TT. There were no differences in glucose and lactate during the TT, or post measures of CK and maximal muscle force. Conclusion Magnesium supplementation reduced the IL-6 response, enhanced recovery of blood glucose, and muscle soreness after strenuous exercise, but did not improve performance or functional measures of recovery.",
keywords = "Magnesium, Interleukin-6, Exercise, Recovery, Glucose, Muscle soreness",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - One week of magnesium supplementation lowers IL-6, muscle soreness and increases post-exercise blood glucose in response to downhill running

AU - Steward, Charles

AU - Zhou, Yue

AU - Keane, Gary

AU - Cook, Matthew David

AU - Liu, Yunyi

AU - Cullen, Tom

PY - 2019/10/17

Y1 - 2019/10/17

N2 - Purpose Magnesium supplementation modulates glucose metabolism and inflammation, which could influence exercise performance and recovery. This study investigated the effect of magnesium intake on physiological responses and performance during eccentric exercise and recovery. Methods Nine male recreational runners completed a counterbalanced, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, registered at ClinicalTrial.gov. Participants consumed low magnesium diets and were supplemented with 500 mg/day of magnesium (SUP) or placebo (CON) for 7 days prior to a 10 km downhill (− 10%) running time trial (TT), separated by a 2-week washout period. At baseline and 24 h post-TT, maximal muscle force was measured. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured at rest, 0 h, 1 h and 24 h post-TT. Muscle soreness was measured at the previous times plus 48 h and 72 h post. Glucose and lactate were measured during the TT. Results The main effect of condition was detected for IL-6 (SUP: 1.36 ± 0.66 vs CON: 2.06 ± 1.14 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.54), sIL-6R (SUP: 27,615 ± 8446 vs CON: 24,368 ± 7806 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.41) and muscle soreness (P < 0.01, η2 = 0.67). Recovery of blood glucose and muscle soreness were enhanced in SUP post-TT. There were no differences in glucose and lactate during the TT, or post measures of CK and maximal muscle force. Conclusion Magnesium supplementation reduced the IL-6 response, enhanced recovery of blood glucose, and muscle soreness after strenuous exercise, but did not improve performance or functional measures of recovery.

AB - Purpose Magnesium supplementation modulates glucose metabolism and inflammation, which could influence exercise performance and recovery. This study investigated the effect of magnesium intake on physiological responses and performance during eccentric exercise and recovery. Methods Nine male recreational runners completed a counterbalanced, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, registered at ClinicalTrial.gov. Participants consumed low magnesium diets and were supplemented with 500 mg/day of magnesium (SUP) or placebo (CON) for 7 days prior to a 10 km downhill (− 10%) running time trial (TT), separated by a 2-week washout period. At baseline and 24 h post-TT, maximal muscle force was measured. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured at rest, 0 h, 1 h and 24 h post-TT. Muscle soreness was measured at the previous times plus 48 h and 72 h post. Glucose and lactate were measured during the TT. Results The main effect of condition was detected for IL-6 (SUP: 1.36 ± 0.66 vs CON: 2.06 ± 1.14 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.54), sIL-6R (SUP: 27,615 ± 8446 vs CON: 24,368 ± 7806 pg/ml) (P < 0.05, η2 = 0.41) and muscle soreness (P < 0.01, η2 = 0.67). Recovery of blood glucose and muscle soreness were enhanced in SUP post-TT. There were no differences in glucose and lactate during the TT, or post measures of CK and maximal muscle force. Conclusion Magnesium supplementation reduced the IL-6 response, enhanced recovery of blood glucose, and muscle soreness after strenuous exercise, but did not improve performance or functional measures of recovery.

KW - Magnesium

KW - Interleukin-6

KW - Exercise

KW - Recovery

KW - Glucose

KW - Muscle soreness

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-019-04238-y

DO - 10.1007/s00421-019-04238-y

M3 - Article

VL - (In -Press)

SP - (In-Press)

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

ER -