On the value of sharing demand information in supply chains

Mohammad Ali, J.E. Boylan

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Many companies are embarking on strategies to share consumer sales data among supply chain members. In most cases, this requires huge investments in information systems and training. Benefits from sharing information have been discussed extensively in the supply chain literature. However, a steady stream of research papers on Downstream Demand Inference (DDI) suggest that the upstream member can mathematically infer the demand at the downstream member. They claim that there is no value in sharing demand information. Subsequent papers scrutinise the model assumptions in this stream of research and show the conditions under which the consumer demand can and cannot be inferred mathematically by the upstream member. Hence, the review of this literature clarifies when information sharing is and is not valuable. In the DDI literature, the evaluation of the conditions under which information sharing is valuable can help companies make more informed decisions on such investments. Under other conditions, where information sharing is not feasible because of such issues as trust and confidentiality, DDI can prove valuable.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationOR56 Annual Conference - Keynote Papers
    EditorsSusan Howick
    PublisherThe OR Society
    Pages44-56
    Number of pages9
    ISBN (Print)0903440571
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event56th Annual Conference of the Operational Research Society - Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, United Kingdom
    Duration: 9 Sep 201411 Sep 2014

    Conference

    Conference56th Annual Conference of the Operational Research Society
    Abbreviated titleOR 2014
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityEgham
    Period9/09/1411/09/14

    Fingerprint

    Supply chain
    Information sharing
    Inference
    Evaluation
    Consumer demand
    Confidentiality
    Information systems

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of the keynote papers are available at: http://www.theorsociety.com/DocumentRepository/Browse.aspx?DocID=491. The paper was given at the 56th Annual Conference of the Operational Research Society, OR 2014; Royal Holloway, University of London Egham, Surrey; United Kingdom; 9 September 2014 through 11 September 2014

    Keywords

    • Demand Information Sharing
    • Downstream Demand Inference
    • Supply Chain Management

    Cite this

    Ali, M., & Boylan, J. E. (2014). On the value of sharing demand information in supply chains. In S. Howick (Ed.), OR56 Annual Conference - Keynote Papers (pp. 44-56). The OR Society.

    On the value of sharing demand information in supply chains. / Ali, Mohammad; Boylan, J.E.

    OR56 Annual Conference - Keynote Papers. ed. / Susan Howick. The OR Society, 2014. p. 44-56.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

    Ali, M & Boylan, JE 2014, On the value of sharing demand information in supply chains. in S Howick (ed.), OR56 Annual Conference - Keynote Papers. The OR Society, pp. 44-56, 56th Annual Conference of the Operational Research Society, Egham, United Kingdom, 9/09/14.
    Ali M, Boylan JE. On the value of sharing demand information in supply chains. In Howick S, editor, OR56 Annual Conference - Keynote Papers. The OR Society. 2014. p. 44-56
    Ali, Mohammad ; Boylan, J.E. / On the value of sharing demand information in supply chains. OR56 Annual Conference - Keynote Papers. editor / Susan Howick. The OR Society, 2014. pp. 44-56
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