No Fault Found events in maintenance engineering Part 2: Root causes, technical developments and future research

Samir Khan, P. Phillips, C. Hockley, I. Jennions

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)
91 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This is the second half of a two paper series covering aspects of the no fault found (NFF) phenomenon, which is highly challenging and is becoming even more important due to increasing complexity and criticality of technical systems. Part 1 introduced the fundamental concept of unknown failures from an organizational, behavioral and cultural stand point. It also reported an industrial outlook to the problem, recent procedural standards, whilst discussing the financial implications and safety concerns. In this issue, the authors examine the technical aspects, reviewing the common causes of NFF failures in electronic, software and mechanical systems. This is followed by a survey on technological techniques actively being used to reduce the consequence of such instances. After discussing improvements in testability, the article identifies gaps in literature and points out the core areas that should be focused in the future. Special attention is paid to the recent trends on knowledge sharing and troubleshooting tools; with potential research on technical diagnosis being enumerated. Publisher statement: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering & System Safety. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Reliability Engineering & System Safety [Vol 123, (2014)]. DOI: 10.1016/j.ress.2013.10.013 . © 2015, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196–208
JournalReliability Engineering & System Safety
Volume123
Early online date22 Nov 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

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Security systems
Quality control

Bibliographical note

This research was partially supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Ministry of Defence, BAE Systems, Bombardier Transportation and Rolls Royce. Coventry author Dr Khan was working at Cranfield university at the time the research was carried out.
NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering & System Safety. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Reliability Engineering & System Safety [Vol 123, (2014)]. DOI: 10.1016/j.ress.2013.10.013 .
© 2015, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

  • No fault found
  • Test equipment
  • Troubleshooting failures
  • Fault diagnostics
  • Maintainability
  • Testability

Cite this

No Fault Found events in maintenance engineering Part 2: Root causes, technical developments and future research. / Khan, Samir; Phillips, P.; Hockley, C.; Jennions, I.

In: Reliability Engineering & System Safety, Vol. 123, 03.2014, p. 196–208.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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