New Brutalism, Again

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In January 1955, Architectural Design published its first long-form article on New Brutalism. The article, co-authored by Alison and Peter Smithson and Theo Crosby asserted that New Brutalism could be attributed to two sources: the works of Rudolf Wittkower and traditional Japanese architecture. This paper will offer a close examination of these influences which have too often been overlooked in historiographies of New Brutalism. Through a deeper focus on the collaborations between Crosby, Alison and Peter Smithson, I will reveal the lesser-known friendship and intellectual exchange between the three architects in the formative years of their careers. By tracing the debates amongst Reyner Banham, the Smithson couple and Crosby on the role of history and tradition in New Brutalism, I aim to shed light on the evolution, and mutation, of the New Brutalism discourse.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalArchitecture and Culture
Volume7
Issue number2
Early online date12 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Brutalism
Peter Smithson
Mutation
Reyner Banham
Discourse
Japanese Architecture
Architectural Design
Formative Years
Historiography
Friendship
History
Theo Crosby

Keywords

  • New Brutalism
  • Postmodernism
  • Post-war Architecture

Cite this

New Brutalism, Again. / Kei, Yat Shun.

In: Architecture and Culture, Vol. 7, No. 2, 12.08.2019, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kei, Yat Shun. / New Brutalism, Again. In: Architecture and Culture. 2019 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 1-20.
@article{17cec5767b5b437b94214b9456f25c1e,
title = "New Brutalism, Again",
abstract = "In January 1955, Architectural Design published its first long-form article on New Brutalism. The article, co-authored by Alison and Peter Smithson and Theo Crosby asserted that New Brutalism could be attributed to two sources: the works of Rudolf Wittkower and traditional Japanese architecture. This paper will offer a close examination of these influences which have too often been overlooked in historiographies of New Brutalism. Through a deeper focus on the collaborations between Crosby, Alison and Peter Smithson, I will reveal the lesser-known friendship and intellectual exchange between the three architects in the formative years of their careers. By tracing the debates amongst Reyner Banham, the Smithson couple and Crosby on the role of history and tradition in New Brutalism, I aim to shed light on the evolution, and mutation, of the New Brutalism discourse.",
keywords = "New Brutalism, Postmodernism, Post-war Architecture",
author = "Kei, {Yat Shun}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1080/20507828. 2019.1614768",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "1--20",
journal = "Architecture and Culture Journal",
issn = "2050-7828",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - New Brutalism, Again

AU - Kei, Yat Shun

PY - 2019/8/12

Y1 - 2019/8/12

N2 - In January 1955, Architectural Design published its first long-form article on New Brutalism. The article, co-authored by Alison and Peter Smithson and Theo Crosby asserted that New Brutalism could be attributed to two sources: the works of Rudolf Wittkower and traditional Japanese architecture. This paper will offer a close examination of these influences which have too often been overlooked in historiographies of New Brutalism. Through a deeper focus on the collaborations between Crosby, Alison and Peter Smithson, I will reveal the lesser-known friendship and intellectual exchange between the three architects in the formative years of their careers. By tracing the debates amongst Reyner Banham, the Smithson couple and Crosby on the role of history and tradition in New Brutalism, I aim to shed light on the evolution, and mutation, of the New Brutalism discourse.

AB - In January 1955, Architectural Design published its first long-form article on New Brutalism. The article, co-authored by Alison and Peter Smithson and Theo Crosby asserted that New Brutalism could be attributed to two sources: the works of Rudolf Wittkower and traditional Japanese architecture. This paper will offer a close examination of these influences which have too often been overlooked in historiographies of New Brutalism. Through a deeper focus on the collaborations between Crosby, Alison and Peter Smithson, I will reveal the lesser-known friendship and intellectual exchange between the three architects in the formative years of their careers. By tracing the debates amongst Reyner Banham, the Smithson couple and Crosby on the role of history and tradition in New Brutalism, I aim to shed light on the evolution, and mutation, of the New Brutalism discourse.

KW - New Brutalism

KW - Postmodernism

KW - Post-war Architecture

UR - https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/EHX2T4QAGTIYVPK7MJBF/full?target=10.1080/20507828.2019.1614768

U2 - 10.1080/20507828. 2019.1614768

DO - 10.1080/20507828. 2019.1614768

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 1

EP - 20

JO - Architecture and Culture Journal

JF - Architecture and Culture Journal

SN - 2050-7828

IS - 2

ER -