Never Failed? The Local Reporting of the Blitzes in Coventry and Liverpool in 1940 and 1941

Guy Hodgson, Rachel Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The self-narrated position of the provincial press in the Second Word War is that newspapers were steadfast friends to the communities they sought to serve. Their stated role was to maintain publication in the face of adversity, providing simultaneously a vital flow of information and some semblance of normality; this role was never more important than in the wake of major destruction wrought by enemy bombs. However, a qualitative analysis of coverage of the Blitzes in Coventry 1940 and the Liverpool in 1941 suggests that the construction of events in line with the ‘Blitz Sprit’ by local titles was at odds with the experience of people on the ground. As such it leads us to suggest that the result was to undermine long-term confidence in the ability of the press to reflect reality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-176
Number of pages15
JournalMedia History
Volume27
Issue number2
Early online date29 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Blitz
  • Newspaper history
  • provincial press
  • Second World War

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • History

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