#MySubjectivation

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    ‘#MySubjectivation’ explores some of the implications changes in the media landscape, including those generated by the development of corporate social media and social networks such as Twitter and Facebook, have for the ways in which theorists and philosophers create, perform and circulate research and knowledge. It takes as its starting point Bernard Stiegler’s claim that, with the Web and digital reproducibility, we are now living in an era in which subjects are created with a different form of the awareness of time. It proceeds by paying special attention to the medium Stiegler himself employs most frequently to analyse the relation between subjectivity, technology and time: the linearly written and organised, print-on-paper codex text, with all its associated concepts, values and habitual practices (e.g. the long-form argument, individualized proprietorial author, originality, copyright). Can the ongoing changes in the media landscape that are said to be shaping our memories and consciousness be understood, analysed and rethought by subjectivities that continue to live, work and think on the basis of knowledge instruments originating in a very different epistemic environment? Or is the continued reliance of theorists and philosophers on print-on-paper books and journals an example of how capitalism’s cultural and programming industries invent us and our own knowledge work, philosophy and minds by virtue of the way they modify and homogenise our thought and behaviour through their media technologies?
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages83-103
    JournalNew Formations
    Volume79
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    subjectivity
    knowledge work
    twitter
    facebook
    social media
    consciousness
    capitalist society
    social network
    programming
    industry
    Values
    time
    philosophy

    Keywords

    • attention
    • control
    • cultural industries
    • digital
    • economy
    • memory
    • publishing
    • social media
    • Stiegler
    • subjectivity
    • technology
    • university
    • writing

    Cite this

    #MySubjectivation. / Hall, Gary.

    In: New Formations, Vol. 79, 2013, p. 83-103.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hall, Gary. / #MySubjectivation. In: New Formations. 2013 ; Vol. 79. pp. 83-103.
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