Mutual information-based sensor positioning for car cabin comfort control

Diana Hintea, James Brusey, Elena Gaura, Neil Beloe, David Bridge

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Car cabins are transient, non-uniform thermal environments, both with respect to time and space. Identifying representative locations for the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system sensors is an open research problem. Common sensor positioning approaches are driven by considerations such as cost or aesthetics, which may impact on the performance/outputs of the HVAC system and thus occupants’ comfort. Based on experimental data, this paper quantifies the spacial-temporal variations in the cabin’s environment by using Mutual Information (MI) as a similarity measure. The overarching aim for the work is to find optimal (but practical) locations for sensors that: i) can produce accurate estimates of temperature at locations where sensors would be difficult to place, such as on an occupant’s face or abdomen and ii) thus, support the development of occupant rather than cabin focused HVAC control algorithms. When applied to experimental data from stable and hot/cold soaking scenarios, the method proposed successfully identified practical sensor locations which estimate face and abdomen temperatures of an occupant with less than 0.7°C and 0.5°C error, respectively.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems
Pages483-492
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventInternational Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems - Kaiserslautern, Germany
Duration: 12 Sep 201114 Sep 2011
Conference number: 15

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems
Abbreviated titleKES 2011
CountryGermany
CityKaiserslautern
Period12/09/1114/09/11

Fingerprint

Railroad cars
Air conditioning
Sensors
Ventilation
Heating
Temperature
Costs

Bibliographical note

The full text of this article is not available from the repository.

Keywords

  • sensor positioning
  • heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC)
  • mutual information

Cite this

Hintea, D., Brusey, J., Gaura, E., Beloe, N., & Bridge, D. (2011). Mutual information-based sensor positioning for car cabin comfort control. In International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems (pp. 483-492) https://doi.org/10.1007%2F978-3-642-23854-3_51

Mutual information-based sensor positioning for car cabin comfort control. / Hintea, Diana; Brusey, James; Gaura, Elena; Beloe, Neil; Bridge, David.

International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems. 2011. p. 483-492.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Hintea, D, Brusey, J, Gaura, E, Beloe, N & Bridge, D 2011, Mutual information-based sensor positioning for car cabin comfort control. in International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems. pp. 483-492, International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems, Kaiserslautern, Germany, 12/09/11. https://doi.org/10.1007%2F978-3-642-23854-3_51
Hintea D, Brusey J, Gaura E, Beloe N, Bridge D. Mutual information-based sensor positioning for car cabin comfort control. In International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems. 2011. p. 483-492 https://doi.org/10.1007%2F978-3-642-23854-3_51
Hintea, Diana ; Brusey, James ; Gaura, Elena ; Beloe, Neil ; Bridge, David. / Mutual information-based sensor positioning for car cabin comfort control. International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems. 2011. pp. 483-492
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