Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials

Joseph Smyth, Stewart Birrell, Alex Mouzakitis, Paul Jennings

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

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Abstract

To ensure transferability of driving simulator-based user trials (where motion sickness onset is likely) it is important to understand if motion sickness affects human performance and therefore user trial data validity. 51 participants had their task performance ability measured in six defined categories (including physical, cognitive, visual and the intersections of each) both before and after a driving simulator exposure. Their motion sickness state was compared to their change in task completion scores across the six areas. Findings revealed that motion sickness had a significant effect on cognitive performance, physical performance, physical-visual performance and physical-cognitive performance. There was no gender effect on motion sickness severity, but it did affect participant dropout, where female nausea was a significant effector. Age had no effect on motion sickness onset and other findings are also discussed. Conclusions from this research aid in the understanding of simulator-based user trial data validity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018
EditorsNeville Stanton
PublisherSpringer-Verlag London Ltd
Pages445-457
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9783319938844
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes
EventAHFE International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018 - Orlando, United States
Duration: 21 Jul 201825 Jul 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Intelligent Systems and Computing
Volume786
ISSN (Print)2194-5357

Conference

ConferenceAHFE International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period21/07/1825/07/18

Fingerprint

Simulators

Keywords

  • Comfort-safety
  • Human factors
  • Human performance
  • Motion sickness
  • Vehicle simulator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Smyth, J., Birrell, S., Mouzakitis, A., & Jennings, P. (2019). Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials. In N. Stanton (Ed.), Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018 (pp. 445-457). (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing; Vol. 786). Springer-Verlag London Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_40

Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials. / Smyth, Joseph; Birrell, Stewart; Mouzakitis, Alex; Jennings, Paul.

Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018. ed. / Neville Stanton. Springer-Verlag London Ltd, 2019. p. 445-457 (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing; Vol. 786).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Smyth, J, Birrell, S, Mouzakitis, A & Jennings, P 2019, Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials. in N Stanton (ed.), Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 786, Springer-Verlag London Ltd, pp. 445-457, AHFE International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018, Orlando, United States, 21/07/18. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_40
Smyth J, Birrell S, Mouzakitis A, Jennings P. Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials. In Stanton N, editor, Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018. Springer-Verlag London Ltd. 2019. p. 445-457. (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_40
Smyth, Joseph ; Birrell, Stewart ; Mouzakitis, Alex ; Jennings, Paul. / Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials. Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018. editor / Neville Stanton. Springer-Verlag London Ltd, 2019. pp. 445-457 (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing).
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