Morphological spelling in spite of phonological deficits: Evidence from children with dyslexia and Otitis Media

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    Abstract

    The present study examines whether literacy or phonological impairment affects use of morphological spelling constancy; the principle that morphemes are spelled consistently across words. Children with dyslexia or otitis media (OM) were compared to chronological-age matched children and reading-ability matched children. Monomorphemic and polymorphemic nonwords were spelled in a sentence completion dictation task. Use of root and suffix morphemes increased with age in typical development, particularly derivational morphemes. Dyslexic children generally used morphological strategies less than their chronological-age matched peers but to a similar extent as reading-ability matched. OM children showed a specific weakness in using inflectional suffixes. Results suggest different causes for the spelling difficulties in each case: dyslexic children had difficulties in generalising more complex morphological relationships, while the OM children’s difficulties had a phonological/perceptual basis.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1439-1460
    JournalApplied Psycholinguistics
    Volume37
    Issue number6
    Early online date22 Mar 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

    Fingerprint

    Dyslexia
    dyslexia
    Otitis Media
    deficit
    evidence
    Aptitude
    Reading
    Articulation Disorders
    ability
    Phonological Deficit
    Spelling
    literacy
    cause

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The present study examines whether literacy or phonological impairment affects use of morphological spelling constancy; the principle that morphemes are spelled consistently across words. Children with dyslexia or otitis media (OM) were compared to chronological-age matched children and reading-ability matched children. Monomorphemic and polymorphemic nonwords were spelled in a sentence completion dictation task. Use of root and suffix morphemes increased with age in typical development, particularly derivational morphemes. Dyslexic children generally used morphological strategies less than their chronological-age matched peers but to a similar extent as reading-ability matched. OM children showed a specific weakness in using inflectional suffixes. Results suggest different causes for the spelling difficulties in each case: dyslexic children had difficulties in generalising more complex morphological relationships, while the OM children’s difficulties had a phonological/perceptual basis.",
    author = "H. Breadmore and J. Carroll",
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    T1 - Morphological spelling in spite of phonological deficits: Evidence from children with dyslexia and Otitis Media

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    N2 - The present study examines whether literacy or phonological impairment affects use of morphological spelling constancy; the principle that morphemes are spelled consistently across words. Children with dyslexia or otitis media (OM) were compared to chronological-age matched children and reading-ability matched children. Monomorphemic and polymorphemic nonwords were spelled in a sentence completion dictation task. Use of root and suffix morphemes increased with age in typical development, particularly derivational morphemes. Dyslexic children generally used morphological strategies less than their chronological-age matched peers but to a similar extent as reading-ability matched. OM children showed a specific weakness in using inflectional suffixes. Results suggest different causes for the spelling difficulties in each case: dyslexic children had difficulties in generalising more complex morphological relationships, while the OM children’s difficulties had a phonological/perceptual basis.

    AB - The present study examines whether literacy or phonological impairment affects use of morphological spelling constancy; the principle that morphemes are spelled consistently across words. Children with dyslexia or otitis media (OM) were compared to chronological-age matched children and reading-ability matched children. Monomorphemic and polymorphemic nonwords were spelled in a sentence completion dictation task. Use of root and suffix morphemes increased with age in typical development, particularly derivational morphemes. Dyslexic children generally used morphological strategies less than their chronological-age matched peers but to a similar extent as reading-ability matched. OM children showed a specific weakness in using inflectional suffixes. Results suggest different causes for the spelling difficulties in each case: dyslexic children had difficulties in generalising more complex morphological relationships, while the OM children’s difficulties had a phonological/perceptual basis.

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