Monitoring the airport-cdm turnround process: Applying a qualitative cognitive model based on field observations

Matthias Groppe, Romano Pagliari, Don Harris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract

The objective of this study is to better understand the cognitive mechanisms for monitoring the Aircraft Turn-Round Process during normal operation. Networks of participating operators during aircraft turnround are becoming increasingly large and complex, and so creating unique challenges for human operators who must monitor these networks for reliable and safe operation. The aircraft turn-round as the linking element between the arrival phase and departure phase of flight requires specific decision support for the assignment of a Target Off-Block Time (TOBT) which is an important trigger to inform the Air Traffic Management (ATM) network about an estimate for the completion of the turnround. In this study, field observations with focus on cognitive activities were conducted during five different airlines' turn-round operations in situ for a total of approximately 122 hours. Focus was applied on monitoring turn-rounds having only Minimum Turn-Round Time (MTTT) available. This is a novel approach of viewing the turn-round monitoring process since cognitive mechanisms of turn-round controllers have not been identified yet as a contributing factor for TOBT prediction. The findings indicate that monitoring strategies used by turn-round controllers are different, even through problem settings are similar. While turn-round monitoring and control has traditionally taken place at the aircraft, operators started to move management of the turn-round away from physical location of the aircraft into a control room. However, observations have shown that the predictive capabilities inherent at established ways of turn-round monitoring cannot be transferred into a control room without prior analysis of the monitoring and facilitating activities used by the turn-round controllers. Findings were organized in a qualitative cognitive model originally developed domain specific during operators' monitoring of nuclear power plants.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, ICAS 2010
Pages4498-4509
Number of pages12
Volume6
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010 - Nice, France
Duration: 19 Sep 201024 Sep 2010

Conference

Conference27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010
Abbreviated title ICAS 2010
CountryFrance
CityNice
Period19/09/1024/09/10

Fingerprint

Airports
Monitoring
Aircraft
Controllers
Process monitoring
Network management
Nuclear power plants
Air

Keywords

  • Cognitive engineering
  • Collaborative decision making
  • Control room
  • Human-machine interface
  • Turn-round process

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Groppe, M., Pagliari, R., & Harris, D. (2010). Monitoring the airport-cdm turnround process: Applying a qualitative cognitive model based on field observations. In 27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, ICAS 2010 (Vol. 6, pp. 4498-4509)

Monitoring the airport-cdm turnround process : Applying a qualitative cognitive model based on field observations. / Groppe, Matthias; Pagliari, Romano; Harris, Don.

27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, ICAS 2010. Vol. 6 2010. p. 4498-4509.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Groppe, M, Pagliari, R & Harris, D 2010, Monitoring the airport-cdm turnround process: Applying a qualitative cognitive model based on field observations. in 27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, ICAS 2010. vol. 6, pp. 4498-4509, 27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, Nice, France, 19/09/10.
Groppe M, Pagliari R, Harris D. Monitoring the airport-cdm turnround process: Applying a qualitative cognitive model based on field observations. In 27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, ICAS 2010. Vol. 6. 2010. p. 4498-4509
Groppe, Matthias ; Pagliari, Romano ; Harris, Don. / Monitoring the airport-cdm turnround process : Applying a qualitative cognitive model based on field observations. 27th Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences 2010, ICAS 2010. Vol. 6 2010. pp. 4498-4509
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