Mobile phone penetration, mobile banking and inclusive development in africa

S. A. Asongu, Jacinta C. Nwachukwu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study assesses the role of mobile phones and mobile banking in decreasing inequality in 52 African countries. The empirical procedure involves first, examining the income-redistributive effect of mobile phone penetration and then investigating the contribution of mobile banking services in this relationship. The findings suggest an equalizing income-redistributive effect of ‘mobile phone penetration’ and ‘mobile banking’, with a higher income-equalizing effect from mobile banking compared to mobile phone penetration. Poverty alleviation channels explaining this difference in inequality mitigating propensity are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-52
JournalAfrican Finance Journal
Volume18
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Mobile phone
Africa
Penetration
Banking
Income
Redistributive effect
Income effect
Propensity
Poverty alleviation
African countries
Banking services

Bibliographical note

The full text is currently unavailable on the repository.

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Banking
  • Financial development
  • Mobile phones
  • Shadow economy

Cite this

Mobile phone penetration, mobile banking and inclusive development in africa. / Asongu, S. A.; Nwachukwu, Jacinta C.

In: African Finance Journal, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 34-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asongu, S. A. ; Nwachukwu, Jacinta C. / Mobile phone penetration, mobile banking and inclusive development in africa. In: African Finance Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 34-52.
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