Militant Animal Rights Activity: Terrorism, Extremism or Something Else?

Rachel Monaghan, João Raphael da Silva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Since the early 1970s, the United Kingdom (UK) has experienced political violence undertaken by militant animal rights actors. This violence has included the use of car bombs and incendiary devices, which are more akin to the tactics of a terrorist campaign. Similar acts in the United States have been described as “eco-terrorism” yet this label has not gained traction in the UK. This article is concerned with the labelling of militant animal rights actions in the UK and explores the labels that have been applied by the print media, notably The Guardian to the actions of those animal rights actors who have utilised or espoused illegal and violent tactics in the pursuit of their cause. Moreover, the article takes a more in-depth look at the labelling of the group Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) in its campaign against Huntingdon Life Sciences and its business partners. How actions are labelled can have repercussions in shaping the public debate and policy implications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
Number of pages16
JournalStudies in Conflict & Terrorism
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date3 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Apr 2023

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article in part or whole.

Keywords

  • Eco-terrorism
  • Extremism
  • Animal rights
  • Media

Institute themes

  • Security and Resilience
  • Social Movements and Contentious Politics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Militant Animal Rights Activity: Terrorism, Extremism or Something Else?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this