MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

Pierre Redelinghuys, Lauren Whitehead, Andrea Augello, Rebecca A. Drummond, Jean Michel Levesque, Simon Vautier, Delyth M. Reid, Bernhard Kerscher, Julie A. Taylor, Peter A. Nigrovic, John Wright, Graeme I. Murray, Janet A. Willment, Lynne J. Hocking, Maria J.G. Fernandes, Cosimo DeBari, Iain B. Mcinnes, Gordon D. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background Myeloid inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor (MICL, Clec12A) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) expressed predominantly by myeloid cells. Previous studies have suggested that MICL is involved in controlling inflammation. Objective To determine the role of this CLR in inflammatory pathology using Clec12A-/- mice. Methods Clec12A-/- mice were generated commercially and primarily characterised using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Mechanisms and progress of disease were characterised by clinical scoring, histology, flow cytometry, irradiation bone-marrow chimera generation, administration of blocking antibodies and in vivo imaging. Characterisation of MICL in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was determined by immunohistochemistry and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Anti-MICL antibodies were detected in patient serum by ELISA and dot-blot analysis. Results MICL-deficient animals did not present with pan-immune dysfunction, but exhibited markedly exacerbated inflammation during CAIA, owing to the inappropriate activation of myeloid cells. Polymorphisms of MICL were not associated with disease in patients with RA, but this CLR was the target of autoantibodies in a subset of patients with RA. In wild-type mice the administration of such antibodies recapitulated the Clec12A-/- phenotype. Conclusions MICL plays an essential role in regulating inflammation during arthritis and is an autoantigen in a subset of patients with RA. These data suggest an entirely new mechanism underlying RA pathogenesis, whereby the threshold of myeloid cell activation can be modulated by autoantibodies that bind to cell membrane-expressed inhibitory receptors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1386-1391
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Volume75
Issue number7
Early online date14 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this