Mental Fatigue Negatively Influences Manual Dexterity and Anticipation Timing but not Repeated High-intensity Exercise Performance in Trained Adults

Michael J. Duncan, Nicholas Fowler, Oliver George, Samuel Joyce, Joanne Hankey

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Abstract

This study examined the impact of a period of mental fatigue on manual dexterity, anticipation timing and repeated high intensity exercise performance. Using a randomised, repeated measures experimental design, eight physically trained adults (mean age = 24.8 ± 4.1 years) undertook a 40 minute vigilance task to elicit mental fatigue or a control condition followed by four repeated Wingate anaerobic performance tests. Pre, post fatigue/control and post each Wingate test, manual dexterity (Seconds), coincidence anticipation (absolute error) were assessed. A series of two (condition) by six (time) ways repeated measures ANOVAs indicated a significant condition by time interactions for manual dexterity time (p = 0.021) and absolute error (p = 0.028). Manual dexterity and coincidence anticipation were significantly poorer post mental fatigue compared with control. There were no significant differences in mean power between conditions or across trials (all p > 0.05). Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal on 29th January 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15438627.2014.975811
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
JournalResearch in Sports Medicine: An International Journal
Volume23
Issue number1
Early online date29 Jan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Mental Fatigue
Sports Medicine
Manuscripts
Fatigue
Analysis of Variance
Research Design
Research

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal on 29th January 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15438627.2014.975811

Keywords

  • perception-action coupling
  • vigilance
  • cycling

Cite this

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abstract = "This study examined the impact of a period of mental fatigue on manual dexterity, anticipation timing and repeated high intensity exercise performance. Using a randomised, repeated measures experimental design, eight physically trained adults (mean age = 24.8 ± 4.1 years) undertook a 40 minute vigilance task to elicit mental fatigue or a control condition followed by four repeated Wingate anaerobic performance tests. Pre, post fatigue/control and post each Wingate test, manual dexterity (Seconds), coincidence anticipation (absolute error) were assessed. A series of two (condition) by six (time) ways repeated measures ANOVAs indicated a significant condition by time interactions for manual dexterity time (p = 0.021) and absolute error (p = 0.028). Manual dexterity and coincidence anticipation were significantly poorer post mental fatigue compared with control. There were no significant differences in mean power between conditions or across trials (all p > 0.05). Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal on 29th January 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15438627.2014.975811",
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AU - Joyce, Samuel

AU - Hankey, Joanne

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