Men's experiences of having a partner who requires Mother and Baby Unit admission for first episode postpartum psychosis

Rebecca Boddy, Carolyn Gordon, Fiona MacCallum, Mary McGuinness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
175 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

AimsThe aim of this study was to explore the experiences of men during their partner's admission to a Mother and Baby Unit for first episode postpartum psychosis.BackgroundPostpartum psychosis can be life-changing for women, however little is known about the impact on their partners or their partners' needs.DesignAn Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis approach was used to analyse interview transcripts.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted with seven participants. Interviews were conducted in 2014–2015.FindingsTwo main themes were identified: ‘What the f*** is going on?’ and ‘Time to figure out how your family works’. Partners experienced shock and confusion during postpartum psychosis onset. Most felt hospital admission was beneficial, although there were barriers to accessing help and involvement in their partner's care. A process of understanding changes to roles, relationships and family identity was described. Loss was a common experience, with a potentially lasting impact.ConclusionsMen reported a range of challenging and positive experiences associated with their partner's postpartum psychosis. Improvements are needed in awareness of postpartum psychosis, access to appropriate services and support of partners. Publisher Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boddy, R, Gordon, C, MacCallum, F & McGuinness, M 2017, 'Men's experiences of having a partner who requires Mother and Baby Unit admission for first episode postpartum psychosis' Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol 73, no. 2, pp. 399-409, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.13110 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)399-409
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume73
Issue number2
Early online date17 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

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Psychotic Disorders
Postpartum Period
Mothers
Interviews
Confusion
Shock
Nursing

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boddy, R, Gordon, C, MacCallum, F & McGuinness, M 2017, 'Men's experiences of having a partner who requires Mother and Baby Unit admission for first episode postpartum psychosis' Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol 73, no. 2, pp. 399-409, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.13110 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Keywords

  • acute care
  • mental health
  • midwifery
  • mother and baby unit
  • nursing
  • postpartum psychosis
  • psychiatric nursing
  • qualitative approaches
  • spouses

Cite this

Men's experiences of having a partner who requires Mother and Baby Unit admission for first episode postpartum psychosis. / Boddy, Rebecca; Gordon, Carolyn; MacCallum, Fiona; McGuinness, Mary.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 73, No. 2, 02.2017, p. 399-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boddy, Rebecca ; Gordon, Carolyn ; MacCallum, Fiona ; McGuinness, Mary. / Men's experiences of having a partner who requires Mother and Baby Unit admission for first episode postpartum psychosis. In: Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2017 ; Vol. 73, No. 2. pp. 399-409.
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N2 - AimsThe aim of this study was to explore the experiences of men during their partner's admission to a Mother and Baby Unit for first episode postpartum psychosis.BackgroundPostpartum psychosis can be life-changing for women, however little is known about the impact on their partners or their partners' needs.DesignAn Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis approach was used to analyse interview transcripts.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted with seven participants. Interviews were conducted in 2014–2015.FindingsTwo main themes were identified: ‘What the f*** is going on?’ and ‘Time to figure out how your family works’. Partners experienced shock and confusion during postpartum psychosis onset. Most felt hospital admission was beneficial, although there were barriers to accessing help and involvement in their partner's care. A process of understanding changes to roles, relationships and family identity was described. Loss was a common experience, with a potentially lasting impact.ConclusionsMen reported a range of challenging and positive experiences associated with their partner's postpartum psychosis. Improvements are needed in awareness of postpartum psychosis, access to appropriate services and support of partners. Publisher Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boddy, R, Gordon, C, MacCallum, F & McGuinness, M 2017, 'Men's experiences of having a partner who requires Mother and Baby Unit admission for first episode postpartum psychosis' Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol 73, no. 2, pp. 399-409, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.13110 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

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